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Archive for the ‘Apple’ Category

Cut and Paste Files & Folders in Mac OS X

Posted by Jeroen Pluimers on 2014/04/18

Boy, I wish I had found this far earlier:

  • in Windows Explorer this is called cut & paste:
    Ctrl+X & Ctrl+V
  • in Mac OS X Finder this is called copy & move items here:
    Command+C & Command+Option+V

Cut and Paste Files & Folders in Mac OS X

Mac OS X Lion and beyond now have the long awaited “Cut and Paste” feature added to the OS X desktop and Finder …

Cutting & Pasting Files and Folders in OS X is Easy

Select files in the Finder, then combine a series of keyboard shortcuts as so:

  1. Command+C copies the files or documents, note they won’t be ‘cut’ yet
  2. Command+Option+V pastes the documents into the new location, cutting it from the prior locating and moving it to the new location

If you just hit Command+V you will only move a copy of the files into the new location, as in a true copy and paste, rather than a cut and paste function. Notice holding down the Option key also changes the menu text to show “Move Items Here” to further signify the difference.

This is a feature many Windows converts have been wanting for a long time…

This works the same within OS X Mountain Lion as well, and will likely continue as a feature in the future versions of the OS X desktop as well.

–jeroen

via: Cut and Paste Files & Folders in Mac OS X.

Posted in Apple, Mac, MacBook, OS X, OS X Lion, OS X Mountain Lion, Power User | Leave a Comment »

MacBook Fn/Option/Ctrl keyboard shortcuts

Posted by Jeroen Pluimers on 2014/04/11

I know that Apple likes “design”, but boy their desing resulted into Mac OS X having lots of Fn/Option/Ctrl/Shift keyboard shortcuts.

Being a keyboard person (before the DOS era), I love to learn new keyboard shortcuts to make my life easier, while vendors are step by step hiding information about them.

I will update this table over time to reflect even better the ones I use most regularly.

BTW: a few links to other shortcut pages/videos:

Keyboard shortcuts I use most often
Fn Shift Control Option Command Key Action (Key) Gesture
Fn Shift Ctrl Option Command Key Action Gesture
Ctrl A Move to begin of line (Home)
Ctrl E Move to end of line
Ctrl Left Move one full screen to the left Three finger swipe left
Ctrl Right Move one full screen to the right Three finger swipe right
Option Left Move one word to the left
Option Right Move one word to the right
Command M Minimize window
Command Left Move to begin of line (Home)
Command Right Move to end of line (End)
Command Up Move one page up (Page Up)
Command Down Move one page down (Page Down)
Ctrl Down Show tiles of Windows for current application
Ctrl Up Show tiles of running applications
Command ` (BackTick) Move to the next Window for the current application
Command C Copy selection to clipboard
Command V Paste selection from clipboard
Command X Cut selection to clipboard
Command Z Undo last action
Command P Print current window/document
Command W Close current window/document
F11 Hide/show all Windows and show/hide desktop
F12 Go to/from dashboard
Fn Left Page Up
Fn Right Page Down
Fn Up Home
Fn Down End
Command H Hide application window
Command Tab Switch application forward
Shift Command Tab Switch application backward
Command T Open a new Tab in your application
Command N Open a new Window in your application
Command Q Quit (Exit) your application
Ctrl Option Command 8 Switch video to inverted (and back)
Command Space Spotlight quick search
Command , (Comma) Go to the preferences/settings of the current application
Ctrl F7 Change how Tab moves (all controls or edit/lists)
Shift Command 3 Save a print screen (screenshot) of the full screen to a file on your desktop
Shift Command 4 Save a print screen (screenshot) of a screen selection or a selected window to a file on your desktop
(space-bar switches between selection/window)
Shift Ctrl Command 3 Save a print screen (screenshot) of the full screen to the clipboard
Shift Ctrl Command 4 Save a print screen (screenshot) of a screen selection or a selected window to the clipboard
(space-bar switches between selection/window)
Option Command + (Plus) Screed zoom in
Option Command - (Minus) Screen zoom out
Command A Select all
Option Command Esc Force quit an application
Command L Show the address line in your web browser
Shift Option K  (the Apple logo)
Option Command W Close all Windows (but do not quit application)
Shift Command Delete In finder: Empty the trash (confirm with dialog)
Command N Open new application window
Command F Find text
 Fn Delete Delete character after the cursor (Ctrl-D)
Ctrl D Delete character after the cursor (Delete)
Command + (Plus) Zoom in
Command - (Minus) Zoom out
Command [ Navigate backwards
Command ] Navigate forwards
Ctrl F2 Focus the menu
Ctrl F3 Focus the finder
Ctrl F4 Focus the active/next window
Shift Ctrl F4 Focus the previous window
Ctrl F5 Focus the toolbar (if any)
Ctrl F6 Focus the first/next panel
Shift Ctrl F6 Focus the previous panel

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, Mac, MacBook, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, OS X, OS X Leopard, OS X Lion, OS X Mountain Lion, OS X Snow Leopard, OS X Tiger, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Mac OS X: Tools that enable keyboard shortcuts to move a window from one monitor to another (via: Ask Different)

Posted by Jeroen Pluimers on 2014/04/10

One of the frustrating things about using a Mac, is the pain to find keyboard shortcuts for everyday tasks.

Having had RSI in the early 1990s, I’ve learned to use the keyboard for virtually everything. So I’m used to find keyboard shortcuts on most operating systems, or write scripts to make common tasks easier.

On most *nix or Windows systems, those shortcuts are either there, easy to enable or tools are there.

For OS X, somehow this seems much harder, so I’m always glad to bumped into answers to questions like

Is there a keyboard shortcut to move a window from one monitor to another? – OSX/Ask Different.

From the answers in that question it is clear this is not built-in behaviour in OS X.

Also the answers show a few tools that can (some free, some paid). So those are on my research list.

But I’m already glad to know that these tools are available.

I’m also going to dig a bit more into Hands-on with OS X Mavericks: Multiple-display support | Macworld, as I’m sure there are some subtle things with multi-monitor setups that I’ve  not yet found myself.

–jeroen

via: osx – Is there a keyboard shortcut to move a window from one monitor to another? – Ask Different.

Posted in Apple, Mac, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, OS X, OS X Lion, OS X Maverick, OS X Mountain Lion, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Mac OS X: Snow Leopard (10.6) and Lion (10.7) had this, but time remaining on battery icon is gone since Mountain Lion (10.8)

Posted by Jeroen Pluimers on 2014/04/07

Every once in a while, some major OS vendor removes a really useful feature.

As of OS X Mountain Lion (10.8), the battery icon indicator cannot show the remaining time on battery any more, though it uses that time to indicate low power.

I’ve found that feature really useful in Lion (10.7) and Snow Leopard (10.6), and I’m pretty sure OS X versions before that also had the option to show the remaining battery (charge) time.

There is a big thread about the lack: Time remaining on Mountain Lion battery: Apple Support Communities.

A quick scan in that thread got me a these replacements:

I hope the $099 one is not written by the people that removed the feature from OS X Mountain Lion (:

After trying a few of the above, I filed a complaint at Apple – Mac OS X – Feedback, clicked on “I have this question too” in Time remaining on Mountain Lion battery and went for SlimBatteryMonitor as it uses the least menu bar estate.

Note that for most applications having icons in the menu bar, this is impossible: osx – Can I change the order of non-apple icons on the menu bar of my MacBook? – Super User.

–jeroen

via: Time remaining on Mountain Lion battery: Apple Support Communities.

Posted in Apple, Mac, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, OS X, OS X Lion, OS X Mountain Lion, OS X Snow Leopard, Power User | Leave a Comment »

2014 and VMware Fusion has still no built-in “Clone this VM”. Workaround from VMware Communities

Posted by Jeroen Pluimers on 2014/04/04

It is well into 2014 now, and VMware Fusion still has no way to Clone a VM like VMware Workstation can.

Too bad. Luckily, IrishMike posted a workaround for this about 7 years ago.

The easiest is if you keep these names very similar:

  • Display Name of the VM (that shows up in your Virtual Machine Library)
  • Name of the directory
  • Name of the .VMDK files
  • Name fo the .VMX files

I do moste of the editing from the console, and used this trick to edit text files from the console.

These are the steps to clone from “master” to “clone” with a little bit of post-editing from my side:

Re: How do we “copy” an entire virtual machine?

  1. Copy the directory holding all the “master” VMware Fusion files to a new one (lets call the directories “master.vmware” and “clone.vmware”).
  2. Inside the “clone.vmware”  directory, change all the files named “master.” to “clone.”
  3. Inside the “clone.vmware” directory, remove these subdirectories if they exist:
    - any directory ending in “.lck”
    - Applications
    - appListCache
    - caches
  4. Then in the same directory, edit the .vmx file changing all occurrences of “master” to “clone”
    - any “fileName” entry
    - any “displayName” entry
    - any “nvram” entry
    - any “extendedConfigFile”
    - any “checkpoint.vmState”
  5. Also in the same directory, edit the main .vmdk file and change the mane of the file from “master-flat.vmdk” to “clone-flat.vmdk”
  6. Then from the Finder or from VMware Fusion, open the .vmx file
  7. Finally tell VMware Fusion that you “copied”  the VM, so it gets a new hardware ID.

Then we’re off and running.

–jeroen

via: VMware Communities: How do we “copy” an entire virtual….

Posted in Apple, Fusion, Mac, MacBook, OS X, OS X Leopard, OS X Lion, OS X Mountain Lion, Power User, VMware, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

 
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