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Resolve issues automatically when users push code in Bitbucket and GitHub

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/05/14

I tend to forget some of the keywords you can put into BitBucket commit messages to relate them to certain issues/bugs/tickets

Below is the table I “borrowed” from the Bitbucket documentation.

Note at the start of the documented the image with the “cset” marking: that’s how an issue refers back to a change set.

These bitbucket cset links seem to be undocumented, but this is what happens:

A “cset” link will be automagically inserted in the issue when you mark the comment of the changeset with any of the below tags/actions.

The hex digits after the “cset” is the hash of the changeset.

The cool thing: these keywords for GitHub are largely the same.

Github keywords:

  • close
  • closes
  • closed
  • fix
  • fixes
  • fixed
  • resolve
  • resolves
  • resolved

Bitbucket table:

Action
Command Keyword
Examples
resolve an issue
  • close
  • closes
  • closed
  • closing
  • fix
  • fixed
  • fixes
  • fixing
  • resolve
  • resolves
  • resolved
  • resolving

close #845

fix bug #89

fixes issue 746

resolving #3117
reopen an issue
  • reopen
  • reopens
  • reopening
reopen #746

reopening #78

mark an issue on hold
  • hold
  • holds
  • holding
holds #123
mark an issue wontfix
  • wontfix
wontfix #12
mark an issue invalid
  • invalidate
  • invalidates
  • invalidated
  • invalidating
invalidates #45
link to a changeset for the issue
  • addresses
  • re
  • references
  • ref
  • refs
  • see
re bug #55

see #34 and #456

 

–jeroen

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