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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Permanently Disable & Prevent Automatic Restart of Windows Update in Windows 10 – Tech Journey

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/09/22

Yay!

Windows 10 automatically restart the PC whenever it installed updates that required a mandatory reboot in order to finish installed. User can no longer delay or postpone a restart indefinitely. […]

The source Permanently Disable & Prevent Automatic Restart of Windows Update in Windows 10 – Tech Journey [WayBack] describes steps to fix a bunch of scenarios:

  • Disable Reboot Task
  • Stop the re-enabling of Reboot task
  • Group Policy (but people reported that Windows 10 ignores the policy when comes to mandatory reboot required for installing updates)
  • Prevent Updates from Installing by forcing your WiFi to act like a “metered” connection
  • Prevent Updates from Installing by setting the Configure Automatic Updates setting in your Local Group Policy Editor
    • For Windows 10 Home edition (that misses the Local Group Policy Editor) setting the above value directly in the registry

–jeroen

via: How to prevent Windows10 from automatically installing updates & rebooting – Primož Gabrijelčič – Google+ [WayBack]

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10 | Leave a Comment »

How to Configure and Manage Network Connections Using ‘nmcli’ Tool

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/09/22

Via “In the form over function era: Using Network Manager from the command line” [WayBack]:

As a Linux administrator you’ve got various tools to use in order to configure network connections, such as: nmtui, NetworkManager GUI and nmcli in Linux

Source: How to Configure and Manage Network Connections Using ‘nmcli’ Tool [WayBack]

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Linux, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Don’t Use Regular Expressions To Parse IP Addresses!

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/09/21

Interesting piece: Don’t Use Regular Expressions To Parse IP Addresses! [WayBack]

TL;DR:

When have neither then for quad-dotted decimal IPv4 addresses (ignoring for instance octals and grouped quads), this is suitable: regex – Regular expression to match DNS hostname or IP Address? – Stack Overflow [WayBack]

ValidIpAddressRegex = "^(([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])$";

Which explained looks like this:

https://regex101.com/r/Wyr2Zd/1

Regular expression:

/ ^(([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])$ / g

Explanation:

  • ^ asserts position at start of the string
    • 1st Capturing Group (([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}
      • {3} Quantifier — Matches exactly 3 times
        A repeated capturing group will only capture the last iteration. Put a capturing group around the repeated group to capture all iterations or use a non-capturing group instead if you’re not interested in the data

        • 2nd Capturing Group ([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])
          • 1st Alternative [0-9]
            • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]
              0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
          • 2nd Alternative [1-9][0-9]
            • Match a single character present in the list below [1-9]
              1-9 a single character in the range between 1 (ASCII 49) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
            • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]
              0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
          • 3rd Alternative 1[0-9]{2}
            • 1 matches the character 1 literally (case sensitive)
            • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]{2}
              {2} Quantifier — Matches exactly 2 times
              0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
          • 4th Alternative 2[0-4][0-9]
            • 2 matches the character 2 literally (case sensitive)
            • Match a single character present in the list below [0-4]
              0-4 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 4 (ASCII 52) (case sensitive)
            • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]
              0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
          • 5th Alternative 25[0-5]
            • 25 matches the characters 25 literally (case sensitive)
            • Match a single character present in the list below [0-5]
              0-5 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 5 (ASCII 53) (case sensitive)
        • \. matches the character . literally (case sensitive)
    • 3rd Capturing Group ([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])
      • 1st Alternative [0-9]
        • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]
          0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
      • 2nd Alternative [1-9][0-9]
        • Match a single character present in the list below [1-9]
          1-9 a single character in the range between 1 (ASCII 49) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
        • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]
          0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
      • 3rd Alternative 1[0-9]{2}
        • 1 matches the character 1 literally (case sensitive)
        • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]{2}
          {2} Quantifier — Matches exactly 2 times
          0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
      • 4th Alternative 2[0-4][0-9]
        • 2 matches the character 2 literally (case sensitive)
        • Match a single character present in the list below [0-4]
          0-4 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 4 (ASCII 52) (case sensitive)
        • Match a single character present in the list below [0-9]
          0-9 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 9 (ASCII 57) (case sensitive)
      • 5th Alternative 25[0-5]
        • 25 matches the characters 25 literally (case sensitive)
        • Match a single character present in the list below [0-5]
          0-5 a single character in the range between 0 (ASCII 48) and 5 (ASCII 53) (case sensitive)
  • $ asserts position at the end of the string, or before the line terminator right at the end of the string (if any)
  • Global pattern flags
    g modifier: global. All matches (don’t return after first match)

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, Communications Development, Development, Internet protocol suite, Network-and-equipment, Power User, Software Development, TCP | Leave a Comment »

Mikrotik functions -> hopefully I can translate this to the new syntax

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/09/21

Reminder to self as it would be useful to have these Mikrotik functions in the new function syntax:

–jeroen

Posted in Internet, MikroTik, Power User, Routers | Leave a Comment »

What Does Ruby’s Array#shift do? – Stack Overflow

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/09/20

Once you learn that shift/unshift are like push/pop on the other end of the array, you can mentally drop the ‘f’ from the name of the methods to remember which one ‘dumps’ elements and which one ‘inserts’ them. :)

Source: What Does Ruby’s Array#shift do? – Stack Overflow [WayBack]

Via: Originally shared by This is why I Code

 

Posted in Development, Fun, Ruby, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

 
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