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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘git’ Category

Gitless: a simple version control system built on top of http://gitless.com/

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/10/09

Time to experiment with [WayBack] Gitless: a simple version control system built on top of http://gitless.com/:

Gitless is an experiment to see what happens if you put a simple veneer on an app that changes the underlying concepts. Because Gitless is implemented on top of Git (could be considered what Git pros call a “porcelain” of Git), you can always fall back on Git.

It is open source at https://github.com/sdg-mit/gitless

via: UMass Amherst CICS Distinguished Lecture: Daniel Jackson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) “Towards a Theory of Software Design”

–jeroen

Posted in Development, DVCS - Distributed Version Control, git, Software Development, Source Code Management | Leave a Comment »

Git man-page generator (“Git is easy to learn”)

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/10/08

Somebody didn’t believe the claim “Git is easy to learn” and wrote a [WayBackgit man page generator  (of course with a repository: github: Lokaltog/git-man-page-generator), for example generating

git-complete-tip

NAME

git-complete-tipcomplete all non-committed downstream tips opposite of a few rebased remote indices

SYNOPSIS

git-complete-tip [ –maintain-log | –lecture-violate-history ]

DESCRIPTION

git-complete-tip completes a few staged tips inside any forward-ported non-staged unstaged indices, and a few checked out subtrees fscked by histories in the tree, but that are not in HOLD_SUBTREE, are checked out in a temporary pack.

 …

For the same reason there is [WayBack] XKXD: Git (image on the right), which is [WayBack] explained for a reason. Just see this little summary:

The difficulty of using Git in common situations is belied by the apparent simplicity of its use in tutorial-style situations. Committing and sharing changes is fairly straightforward, for instance, but recovering from situations such as accidental commits, pushes or bad merges is difficult without a solid understanding of the rather large and complex conceptual model. For instance, three of the top five highest voted questions on Stack Overflow are questions about how to carry out relatively simple tasks: undoing the last commit, changing the last commit message, and deleting a remote branch.

Actually the “easy to learn” means “there is easy to find documentation for it“.

–jeroen

via: UMass Amherst CICS Distinguished Lecture: Daniel Jackson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) “Towards a Theory of Software Design”

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Development, DVCS - Distributed Version Control, Fun, git, Software Development, Source Code Management | Leave a Comment »

Fork – a fast and friendly git client for Mac

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/09/24

Works for Windows too: [WayBack] Fork – a fast and friendly git client for Mac.

Via [WayBack] Weekend Reader 2017.46 – reality-loop(who switched away from SourceTree, because, well, that was ahead of it’s time but in the end couldn’t keep up with reality)

–jeroen

Posted in Development, DVCS - Distributed Version Control, git, git-fork, Software Development, Source Code Management, SourceTree | Leave a Comment »

git add remote with tracking

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/27

Since I keep forgetting this and the top search for “git remote add” “tracking” do not answer it (see for instance …):

git remote add gitlab https://user@gitlab.com/group/subgroup/repository.git -t master

This adds a new gitlab remote on the repository path https://user@gitlab.com/group/subgroup/repository.git tracking branch master.

–jeroen

Posted in Development, DVCS - Distributed Version Control, git, Source Code Management | Leave a Comment »

Some git versus PlasticSCM comparisons

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/01

Via a co-worker:

In my own experience, PlasticSCM needs a lot of work, especially on the usability side:

  1. PlasticSCM call themselves a DVCS, but in order to have a local full repository like all other DVCS systems, you have to run a local server (and a license for it, I still need to sort out if that is free or paid). For the DVCS definition, see Distributed version control – Wikipedia. This means you run a client, a local PlasticSCM server and a remote PlasticSCM server.
  2. Despite there being a CLI version (more on that in a future post), the GUI does not show the exact CLI syntax for commands (unlike most git tools that do). This means you need to think thrice when translating them from GUI to CLI, made even harder by most UI access paths having different ways to copy their information to the clipboard.
  3. When you run the Plastic SCM GUI client long enough, even on a small repository, you will get errors about not enough quota being available (the dreaded 0x718): [WayBack] System Error Codes (1700-3999) | Microsoft Docs ERROR_NOT_ENOUGH_QUOTA 1816 (0x718): Not enough quota is available to process this command.
  4. Often after scanning for changes, you see a lot of changed files. If you click each file, you see  “Files are identical”

    • As a result you have to perform “Undo Unchanged”:
    • I never have this when using git.
  5. Online PlasticSCM hosting parties, especially integrated with bug tracking, are far and few between: besides [WayBackPlasticSCM cloud, I have not found any. Take the git world, or even the Mercurial world and there are far more choices (yes I know about the manual labour involved setting it up described at [WayBack] Plastic SCM version control · Task and issue tracking systems guide and [Archive.is] Plastic SCM blog: Integrating Plastic SCM with Trac Issue Tracking).

One thing that baffled me is that you can edit commit messages. Changing them does not result in another commit. This means that these are not set in stone which is very odd when you see all changes in the commit history.

[Archive.is] Are check-in comment editable?

Sure!

The commit message textbox is editable, start typing and then push save. :)

I realized that in the Branch Explorer one can edit them using the procedure you’ve described, but if you open a changset from “Changesets” or somewhere else, the comment on the top is readonly. Maybe it would be nice to be have a way to edit it there, though I guess, it would be a rarely used feature.

At the changesets view you are also able to do it by cliking in the “Show extended information” button.

I’m afraid that this are the only spots to do it.

–jeroen

Posted in Development, DVCS - Distributed Version Control, git, Source Code Management | Leave a Comment »

 
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