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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

Rumors of Cmd’s death have been greatly exaggerated – but it still pays to switch to PowerShell

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/21

About a year ago, [WayBackRumors of Cmd’s death have been greatly exaggerated – Windows Command Line Tools For Developers got published as a response to confusing posts like these:

But I still think it’s a wise idea to switch away from the Cmd and to PowerShell as with PowerShell you get way more consistent language features, far better documentation, truckloads of new features (of which I like the object pipeline and .NET interoperability most) and far fewer quirks.

It’s time as well, as by now, Windows 7 has been EOL for a while, and Windows 8.x is in extended support: [WayBackWindows lifecycle fact sheet – Windows Help:

Client operating systems  Latest update or service pack  End of mainstream support  End of extended support
  Windows XP  Service Pack 3  April 14, 2009  April 8, 2014
  Windows Vista  Service Pack 2  April 10, 2012  April 11, 2017
  Windows 7*  Service Pack 1  January 13, 2015  January 14, 2020
  Windows 8  Windows 8.1  January 9, 2018  January 10, 2023
Windows 10, released in July 2015**  N/A  October 13, 2020  October 14, 2025

Which means the PowerShell version baseline on supported Windows versions is at least 4.0: [Archive.iswindows 10 powershell version – Google Search and [WayBackPowerShell versions and their Windows version – 4sysops

PowerShell and Windows versions ^
PowerShell Version Release Date Default Windows Versions
PowerShell 2.0 October 2009 Windows 7 Windows Server 2008 R2 (**)
PowerShell 3.0 September 2012 Windows 8 Windows Server 2012
PowerShell 4.0 October 2013 Windows 8.1 Windows Server 2012 R2
PowerShell 5.0 April 2014 (***) Windows 10

So try PowerShell now. You won’t regret it.

–jeroen

via: [WayBack] Very interesting clear-up post and comments on CMD, command.com, PowerShell in past and future DOS/Windows versions and Unix shells altogether. – Ilya S – Google+

Posted in Batch-Files, CommandLine, Development, Power User, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016 | Leave a Comment »

Just in case you are wondering what these %TEMP%\_MEI* folders are about: Google Drive does not cope well with Windows logoff/shutdown…

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/19

From a while back, but still not fixed: [WayBack] Just in case you are wondering what these %TEMP%_MEI* folders are about: Google Drive apparently doesn’t clean up correctly when it exits because you l… – Daniela Osterhagen – Google+

Just in case you are wondering what these %TEMP%\_MEI* folders are about: Google Drive apparently doesn’t clean up correctly when it exits because you log off or shut down Windows.

This is ridiculous. It’s not as if there weren’t any options to let Windows do that cleanup if the program fails.

It is still not fixed:

[WayBack] Just in case you are wondering what these %TEMP%_MEI* folders are about: Google Drive apparently doesn’t clean up correctly when it exits because you l… – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+

Adrian Meacham:

Still doing it all these years later – only the size of the garbage left behind has changed (Size: 58.4 MB (61,303,879 bytes) Size on disk: 67.7 MB (71,061,504 bytes) 1/3 of which is icons) – why this isn’t committed to Chrome instead of held open in %TEMP% is beyond reasoning +Google Drive

Original forum source: [Archive.is] _MEI folder created at windows start – Google Product Forums

by Martin Friedl 3/17/13

Hi,
I just found out that on windows the google drive tool creates a ‘_MEIxxxxx’ folder on every startup of windows. The xxxxx is a number that differs at every startup. On my PC (with windows 7) this folder is created on ‘C:\’ and has a size of about 35MB. SO with every start of windows google drive occopies 35 additional MB. It looks as the content of the folder is mainly Pyhton-files.

Is there a way to prevent google drive from creating an additional folder with every start of windows?

Best regards
Martin

10/21/13
Klint said:
If you exit Google Drive by right-clicking the Google Drive icon in your Windows 7 notification area, and selecting Exit, then Google Drive shuts down properly and correctly deletes the _MEIxxx folder. Unfortunately, it leaves the folder behind if you leave Google Drive running when you log out or shut down. So, yes, it is a bug in Google Drive. It ought to terminate properly when the user logs out.

–jeroen

Posted in Google, GoogleDrive, Power User, Windows | Leave a Comment »

0x8024400E error with WSUS SP2

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/16

From a note a very long time ago: [WayBack0x8024400E error with WSUS SP2

TL;DR:

  1. ensure you have at least KB2938066 installed.
  2. while upgrading WSUS, ensure you reboot the server after each update.

Related: [WayBackwindows – WSUS clients failing to get updates with error 80072EE2 – Server Fault

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2 | Leave a Comment »

Windows 10: Update error 0x8024a112 | Born’s Tech and Windows World

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/13

Had this happen on a Dutch Windows 10 system today, a retry did not work, but a manual reboot solved it [WayBack] Windows 10: Update error 0x8024a112 | Born’s Tech and Windows World.

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10 | Leave a Comment »

What is Swapfile.sys and How Do You Delete It?

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/09

Windows 10 (and 8) include a new virtual memory file named swapfile.sys. It’s stored in your system drive, along with the pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys. But why does Windows need both a swap file and a page file?

In summary, the swapfile — swapfile.sys — is currently used for swapping out Microsoft’s new style of app. Microsoft has called these universal apps, Windows Store apps, Metro apps, Modern apps, Windows 8 apps, Windows 8-style UI apps, and other things at various points.

via:

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 9 | Leave a Comment »

 
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