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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

The only practical way of running x86 VMs on Apple M1 seems to be QEMU based UTM

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/07/01

Few articles exist on running x86 VMs on Apple M1 architecture.

This is the best I found, and clearly states that QEMU based UTM is the way to go, but notably lacks 3D support: [Wayback/Archive.is] Apple Silicon M1: How to run x86 and ARM Virtual Machines on it? | by Dmitry Yarygin | Mar, 2021 | Medium

Without VMs, but running Windows x86_64 code is already possible using Windows 10 for ARM via Parallels: [Wayback] Windows 10 on M1 Macs: What you can do (virtualization, sorta) and can’t (Boot Camp) | Macworld.

VMware Fusion is not going to support x86_64 virtualisation anytime soon as per [Wayback/Archive.is] Fusion on Apple Silicon: Progress Update – VMware Fusion Blog – VMware Blogs

What about x86 emulation?

We get asked regularly about running x86 VMs on M1 Macs. It makes total sense… If Apple can emulate x86 with Rosetta 2, surely VMware can do something too, right?

Well, the short answer is that there isn’t exactly much business value relative to the engineering effort that is required, at least for the time being. For now, we’re laser focused on making Arm Linux VMs on Apple silicon a delight to use.

So, to be a bit blunt, running x86 operating systems on Apple silicon is not something we are planning to deliver with this project. Installing Windows or Linux from an x86 ISO, for example, will not work.

More on UTM, which is open source:

Now hopefully someone posts a Wiki of running x86_64 Windows on Apple M1 (:

This is a small start that it can be done [Wayback/Archive.is] Has anyone tried running Delphi on Windows ARM? – Delphi IDE and APIs – Delphi-PRAXiS [en]

It works well. I’ve managed to build and run my VCL and FMX projects on Android, iOS, Windows and Mac without any problems.
Note that both Windows ARM and the way it runs Delphi are still in preview so tread carefully!
On 4/18/2021 at 8:01 PM, Der schöne Günther said:
Can you confirm it cannot only build projects but also debug them?
I can debug Windows and Android no problem. I’m having issues debugging iOS as it’s stopping in the IDE but showing the CPU rather than code views. I believe this might be a badly built component I need to re-install rather than an issue with the environment but can’t confirm either way at the moment.

An update on the debugging issues on iOS – it’s all working now. My VM just needed a restart and I can debug without problems now.

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, Apple, Windows, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Mac, Virtualization, Windows 10, Qemu, UTM, M1 Mac | Leave a Comment »

chocolatey-community/chocolatey-test-environment: A testing setup related to how the Chocolatey Package Verifier runs testing. Used for manual testing or prior to submission

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/06/29

On my list of things to play around with: [Wayback/Archive.is] chocolatey-community/chocolatey-test-environment: A testing setup related to how the Chocolatey Package Verifier runs testing. Used for manual testing or prior to submission

It sort of is a standalone version of the [Wayback] Chocolatey Software Docs | Package Verifier Moderation Service that you can use to check Chocolatey package that you develop/modify.

From the github repository README:

Requirements

You need a computer with:

  • a 64-bit processor and OS
  • Intel VT-x enabled (usually not an issue if your computer is newer than 2011). This is necessary because we are using 64bit VMs.
  • Hyper-V may need to be disabled for Virtualbox to work properly if your computer is a Windows box. NOTE: This may actually not be required.
  • At least 10GB of free space.

Setup

To get started, ensure you have the following installed:

  • Vagrant 1.8.1+ – linked clones is the huge reason here. You can technically use any version of Vagrant 1.3.5+. But you will get the best performance with 1.8.x+. It appears you can go up to Vagrant 2.1.5, but may have some issues with 2.2.2 and Windows guests (newer versions may be fine).
  • Virtualbox 4.3.28+ – 6.1.6 (this flows in the selection of Vagrant – 5.2.22 seems to have some issues but newer versions may work fine)
  • vagrant sahara plugin (vagrant plugin install sahara)

NOTE: If you decide to run with version 1.8.1 of Vagrant, you are going to need to set the VAGRANT_SERVER_URL environment variable as described in this forum post, otherwise, you will get an HTTP 404 error when attempting to download the base vagrant box used here.

Related: people wanting to do a similar thing for Linux: [Archive.is] chocolatey/choco: Has anyone ever tried to set up virtual box with linux (e.g. ubuntu) for choco testing ? – Gitter

Yes, it should work for choco newchoco pack, and choco push, running on mono.
[Wayback/Archive.is] https://github.com/chocolatey/choco/runs/3660684196?check_suite_focus=true

There is also a dockerfile available here:
[Wayback/Archive.is] https://github.com/chocolatey/choco/tree/develop/docker

However, as @AdmiringWorm said, there are not any official builds or official support at this time.

In my own private fork of choco however I’m using such interfaces as RestartManager

    //https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/api/restartmanager/nf-restartmanager-rmstartsession
    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll", SetLastError = true, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern int RmStartSession(out uint pSessionHandle,
                                     int dwSessionFlags,
                                     string strSessionKey);

    //https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/api/restartmanager/nf-restartmanager-rmendsession
    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern int RmEndSession(uint pSessionHandle);

    //https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/api/restartmanager/nf-restartmanager-rmgetlist
    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern int RmGetList(uint dwSessionHandle,
                                out uint pnProcInfoNeeded,
                                ref uint pnProcInfo,
                                [In, Out] ProcessInfo[] rgAffectedApps,
                                ref uint lpdwRebootReasons);

those will be windows specific indeed, but I’ll reach them later on.

Tarmo Pikaro

–jeroen

Posted in .NET, Chocolatey, CommandLine, Development, Power User, PowerShell, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, Windows | Leave a Comment »

Windows: require UAC elevation to enter password instead of a simple “Yes” helps preventing USB HID attacks

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/06/17

Of course you should be careful inserting random USB devices. Apart from USB HID attacks, they could perform other attacks like DMA ones.

To help preventing automated UAC elevation, you can make it harder to activate UAC by requiring a password. I think the below registry trick and policy is supported as of Windows 7, but it could be more recent (i.e. Windows 8.1).

The video below shows the trick, but does not document it in text. So here we go [WayBack] Windows doesn’t ask for your password when changing settings – Windows 10 Forums

reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "ConsentPromptBehaviorAdmin" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "ConsentPromptBehaviorUser" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "EnableInstallerDetection" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "EnableLUA" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "EnableSecureUIAPaths" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "EnableUIADesktopToggle" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "FilterAdministratorToken" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f
reg add "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System" /v "PromptOnSecureDesktop" /t REG_DWORD /d "1" /f

(A more elaborate batch file with lots more hardening is at [WayBack] Win 10 edits · GitHub)

The registry trick is especially useful for Home editions of Windows which do not allow you to run the Security Policy control panel applet secpol.msc.

The first two values explained at [WayBack] How to configure Windows UAC prompt behavior for admins and users – gHacks Tech News:

ConsentPromptBehaviorAdmin

This key defines the User Account Control behavior for system administrators. The default value is set to prompt but do not require credentials to be entered. Here are all possible values:

  • 0: A value of 0 allows administrators to perform operations that require elevation without consent (meaning prompts) or credentials (meaning authentication).
  • 1: A value of 1 requires the admin to enter username and password when operations require elevated privileges on a secure desktop.
  • 2: The value of 2 displays the UAC prompt that needs to be permitted or denied on a secure desktop. No authentication is required.
  • 3:  A value of 3 prompts for credentials.
  • 4: A value of 4 prompts for consent by displaying the UAC prompt.
  • 5: The default value of 5 prompts for consent for non-Windows binaries.

ConsentPromptBehaviorUser

  • 0: A value of 0 will automatically deny any operation that requires elevated privileges if executed by standard users.
  • 1: The value of 1 will display a prompt to enter the username and password of an administrator to run the operation with elevated privileges on the secure desktop.
  • 3: The default value of 3 prompts for credentials on a secure desktop.

The changes should take effect immediately. You can for instance set the admin behavior to 0 so that no prompts are displayed, and user behavior to 0 as well to prevent them from running operations that require elevated privileges.

Related:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 | Leave a Comment »

How can you export the Visual Studio Code extension list? (via: Stack Overflow)

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/06/16

Adapted from [Archive.is] How can you export the Visual Studio Code extension list? – Stack Overflow, presuming that code is on the PATH:

  1. From the command-line interface on MacOS, Linux, BSD or on Windows with git installed:
    code --list-extensions | xargs -L 1 echo code --install-extension
  2. From the command-line interface on MacOS, Linux, BSD or on Windows without git installed:
    code --list-extensions | % { "code --install-extension $_" }

    or, as I think, more clearly (see also [WayBack] syntax – What does “%” (percent) do in PowerShell? – Stack Overflow):

    code --list-extensions | foreach { "code --install-extension $_" }

    or even more explanatory:

    code --list-extensions | ForEach-Object { "code --install-extension $_" }
  3. From the command-line interface on Windows as a plain cmd.exe command:
    @for /f %l in ('code --list-extensions') do @echo code --install-extension %l
  4. On Windows as a plain cmd.exe batch file (in a .bat/.cmd script):
    @for /f %%l in ('code --list-extensions') do @echo code --install-extension %%l
  5. The above two on Windows can also be done using PowerShell:
    PowerShell -Command "code --list-extensions | % { """""code --install-extension $_""""" }"

    Note that here too, the % can be expanded into foreach or ForEach-Object for clarity.

All of the above prepend “code --install-extension ” (note the trailing space) before each installed Visual Studio Code extension.

They all give you a list like this which you can execute on any machine having Visual Studio Code installed and its code on the PATH, and a working internet connection:

code --install-extension DavidAnson.vscode-markdownlint
code --install-extension ms-vscode.powershell
code --install-extension yzhang.markdown-all-in-onex

(This is about the minimum install for me to edit markdown documents and do useful things with PowerShell).

Of course you can pipe these to a text-file script to execute them later on.

The double-quote escaping is based on [Wayback/Archive.is] How to escape PowerShell double quotes from a .bat file – Stack Overflow:

you need to escape the " on the command line, inside a double quoted string. From my testing, the only thing that seems to work is quadruple double quotes """" inside the quoted parameter:

powershell.exe -command "echo '""""X""""'"

Via: [Archive.is] how to save your visual studio code extension list – Google Search

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, .NET, bash, Batch-Files, CommandLine, Console (command prompt window), Development, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Power User, PowerShell, PowerShell, Software Development, Visual Studio and tools, vscode Visual Studio Code, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Development, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, WSL Windows Subsystem for Linux, xargs | Leave a Comment »

Some notes on (temporarily) using CIFS/SMBv1 with Windows 10

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/06/13

Warning: only do this in a well confined network because of the SMBv1 has serious security implications!

Temporarily allowing SMBv1 makes it easier to transfer files from/to ancient Windows XP (virtual) machines.

Sometimes you need those to support hardware for which more modern drivers or support do not exist.

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10, Windows XP | Leave a Comment »

 
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