The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

tcp – How can I trigger a script when a certain port becomes available for requests? – Unix & Linux Stack Exchange

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/10/09

Netcat to the rescue waiting for a Windows 10 upgrade to finish (which can take hours):

while ! nc -z 172.22.0.67 3389; do echo "sleeping"; sleep 10; done; echo 'The server is up!'

Via: [WayBacktcp – How can I trigger a script when a certain port becomes available for requests? – Unix & Linux Stack Exchange, quoting from the answer:

  • nc is Netcat, “the Swiss-army knife for TCP/IP”,
  • -z means: do not send any data, just check if the port is open,
  • while ! nc -z …; do sleep 0.1; done: keep checking and sleeping for one tenth of a second until the port opens up, i.e. Netcat returns with a zero (success) status.

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Communications Development, Development, Internet protocol suite, Power User, TCP, Windows | Leave a Comment »

When Windows removes the registry key that solves HighDPI problems for older applications

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/10/01

I write about this registry key before: Applications that scale badely on High-DPI Displays: How to Stop the Madness – via: SQLServerCentral « The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

It seems that there is a bad Windows habit: [WayBack] I just love it when Windows decides to remove registry entries I’ve added and screws up something I fixed for them. – Roderick Gadellaa – Google+

–jeroen

 

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10 | Leave a Comment »

For Love of Software: Nano Server on AWS: Step by Step

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/09/24

Source: [WayBackFor Love of Software: Nano Server on AWS: Step by Step

Via: [WayBackAnn Lynnworth – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in Development, Power User, Windows, Windows Server 2016 | Leave a Comment »

When Windows 8.1 gives 80070643 on applying Office 2013 SP1

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/09/17

Steps to try first:

  1. Check %windir%\Windowsupdate.log (on my system, it did not reveal anything special)
  2. In an administrator command prompt, run sfc /scannow (which takes a few minutes to run)
  3. Reboot
  4. Run Clean Manager %windir%\System32\cleanmgr.exe (ensure to clean up update files: it can take tens of minutes to run)
  5. Reboot
  6. Download the SP1 files (I needed 32-bit x86)
  7. Install SP1 manually
  8. If it still hangs:
    1. In Appwiz.cpl try a “Repair” of the Office 2013 installation
    2. If it works: Reboot, otherwise:
      1. Uninstall Office 2013
      2. Disable the network adapter
      3. Reboot
      4. Check if KB3173424 is installed (check it with Appwiz.cpl)
        1. if not: download on a different machine, transfer over USB, install, then reboot
      5. Check ifKB3172614 is installed (which has a younger Windows Update Client)
        1. if not: downloadon a different machine, transfer over USB, install, then reboot
      6. Enable the network adapter
      7. Let Windows scan for updates and install them
        1. If you get an error 80070463 or 80070663: just reboot and retry the updates.
      8. Reboot
      9. Run Clean Manager
      10. Install Office 2013
      11. Reboot
  9. Let Windows scan for updates and install them
  10. Reboot
  11. Run Clean Manager
  12. Reboot

The KB3172614 should also alleviate long during (dozens of minutes) high CPU usage of svchost.exe and TiWorker.exe when searching for Windows updates.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Office, Office 2013, Power User, Windows, Windows 8.1 | Leave a Comment »

How to check if a binary is 32 or 64 bit on Windows? – Super User

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/08/17

It seems there are a few, but only loading the binary is the sure method to know what the process will be using: [WayBackHow to check if a binary is 32 or 64 bit on Windows? – Super User and [WayBack] How do I determine if a .NET application is 32 or 64 bit? – Stack Overflow.

Details in the answers of these questions, here are a few highlights:

  • The first few characters in the binary header reveal what it was originally designed for.
  • A .NET executable might still have an x64 header for bootstrapping.
  • The Windows SDK has a tool dumpbin.exe with the /headers option.
  • You can use sigcheck.exe from SysInternals.
  • The file utility (e.g. from cygwin, which comes with msysgit) will distinguish between 32- and 64-bit executables.
  • Use the command line 7z.exe on the PE file (Exe or DLL) in question which gives you a CPU line.
  • Virustotal File detail is a way to find out if a binary is 32 bit or 64 bit.
  • Even an executable marked as 32-bit can run as 64-bit if, for example, it’s a .NET executable that can run as 32- or 64-bit. For more information see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3782191/how-do-i-determine-if-a-net-application-is-32-or-64-bit, which has an answer that says that the CORFLAGS utility can be used to determine how a .NET application will run.

–jeroen

Search terms: win64, win32, x64, x86_64, x86

Posted in Assembly Language, Development, Power User, Windows, x64, x86 | Leave a Comment »

 
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