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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Scripting’ Category

Installing PowerShell Core on macOS and Linux | Microsoft Docs

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/26

I forgot to blog about this before, but 2 months ago PowerShell core came available: [WayBack] PowerShell Core 6.0: Generally Available (GA) and Supported! | PowerShell Team Blog.

[WayBack] Installing PowerShell Core on macOS and Linux | Microsoft Docs is easy (one way is through homebrew:

$ brew tap caskroom/cask
$ brew cask install powershell

If you already installed a beta, then the steps are these:

$ brew update
$ brew cask reinstall powershell

Note that after installation, it is known as pwsh (at least one of the betas named it powershell) to set PowerShell Core apart from PowerShell*:

$ pwsh --version
PowerShell v6.0.2

Via: [WayBack] PowerShell Core 6.0 is a new edition of PowerShell that is cross-platform (Windows, macOS, and Linux), open-source, and built for heterogeneous environm… – Lars Fosdal – Google+

*pwsh versus powershell

There has been quite a discussion on the PowerShell Core repository on the rename, but I think it is for a good reason.

Too bad that during part of the beta, the old name powershell was used, but beta-time means things break every now and then.

PowerShell Core is sufficiently different from prior PowerShell versions to warrant a name change. This also makes it a lot easier to use them side-by-side.

Many other names (like posh, pcsh or psh) were considered, usually because of naming conflicts with existing tools (like posh) or easy confusion with existing shells (like pcsh and csh). A benefit on Linux/macOS is that it now ends with sh like virtually all other shells.

More background information is at:

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, CommandLine, Development, Home brew, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, MacMini, Power User, PowerShell, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Rumors of Cmd’s death have been greatly exaggerated – but it still pays to switch to PowerShell

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/21

About a year ago, [WayBackRumors of Cmd’s death have been greatly exaggerated – Windows Command Line Tools For Developers got published as a response to confusing posts like these:

But I still think it’s a wise idea to switch away from the Cmd and to PowerShell as with PowerShell you get way more consistent language features, far better documentation, truckloads of new features (of which I like the object pipeline and .NET interoperability most) and far fewer quirks.

It’s time as well, as by now, Windows 7 has been EOL for a while, and Windows 8.x is in extended support: [WayBackWindows lifecycle fact sheet – Windows Help:

Client operating systems  Latest update or service pack  End of mainstream support  End of extended support
  Windows XP  Service Pack 3  April 14, 2009  April 8, 2014
  Windows Vista  Service Pack 2  April 10, 2012  April 11, 2017
  Windows 7*  Service Pack 1  January 13, 2015  January 14, 2020
  Windows 8  Windows 8.1  January 9, 2018  January 10, 2023
Windows 10, released in July 2015**  N/A  October 13, 2020  October 14, 2025

Which means the PowerShell version baseline on supported Windows versions is at least 4.0: [Archive.iswindows 10 powershell version – Google Search and [WayBackPowerShell versions and their Windows version – 4sysops

PowerShell and Windows versions ^
PowerShell Version Release Date Default Windows Versions
PowerShell 2.0 October 2009 Windows 7 Windows Server 2008 R2 (**)
PowerShell 3.0 September 2012 Windows 8 Windows Server 2012
PowerShell 4.0 October 2013 Windows 8.1 Windows Server 2012 R2
PowerShell 5.0 April 2014 (***) Windows 10

So try PowerShell now. You won’t regret it.

–jeroen

via: [WayBack] Very interesting clear-up post and comments on CMD, command.com, PowerShell in past and future DOS/Windows versions and Unix shells altogether. – Ilya S – Google+

Posted in Batch-Files, CommandLine, Development, Power User, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016 | Leave a Comment »

Ben, blogging: Show the complete apache config file

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/03/20

Quite a while back, I got attended to Ben, blogging: Show the complete apache config file:

If you really want to see all the complete config settings, there is no existing tool for that. This Stack Overflow page  answered this question pretty well: You can use apachectl -S to see the settings of Virtual Host, or apachectl -M to see the loaded modules, but to see all settings, there is no such tool, you will have to go through all the files , starting from familiar yourself with the  general structure of the httpd config files.
… script …

The usage is simple: Run it as python  CombineApacheConfig.py . Since there is no additional parameters given, it will retrieve the default Ubuntu apache config file from  /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and generate the result complete config file in /tmp/apache2.combined.conf. If your config file is in different location, then give the input file and output file location.

Note: Apache server-info page http://127.0.0.1/server-info also provide similar information, but not in the config file format. It is in human readable format. The page works only when it is open from the same computer.

Since I could not find how to post comments there, and it works better for me having a repo, I put it into a gist with attribution to hist post: https://gist.github.com/jpluimers/fd300f3a500cbc78cd862d2a248e7b03
I need to adapt it for OpenSuSE; until then run it as this:
python CombineApacheConfig.py /etc/apache2/httpd.conf /tmp/apache2.combined.conf

–jeroen

 

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Apache2, Development, Linux, openSuSE, Power User, Python, Scripting, Software Development, SuSE Linux | Leave a Comment »

Running/execute an Atom.io command not present in the menu/toolbar isn’t that obvious

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/02/15

Took me a while to figure out that you can run any command in Atom.io, even if it’s not in the menu or toolbar:

This isn’t very clear in Atom, but what you’re after is this menu item: Toggle Command Palette

Mac OS X: Shift+Command+P:

Mac OS X: Shift+Command+P

Windows: Ctrl+Shift+P

Windows: Ctrl+Shift+P

–jeroen

via: [WayBackWhere can I run Atom command? – Stack Overflow

Posted in Atom, Development, Power User, Scripting, Software Development, Text Editors | Leave a Comment »

macos – Right-click, create a new text file. How? – Ask Different

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/02/14

I’m still amazed this is not in stock Mac OS X:

In Finder > Select a folder > Right click, we get a popup with an option to create a new folder:Is there a way to add menu item New Textfile for adding a new text file?

[WayBackmacos – Right-click, create a new text file. How? – Ask Different

One way is to use Automator scripts, but: scripting…

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, Automator scripts, Development, iMac, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, MacMini, macOS 10.12 Sierra, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Power User, Scripting, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

 
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