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Archive for the ‘Batch-Files’ Category

defrag.exe: tracking an already in progress operation can be done from non-admin session

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/03/17

When you want to defrag.exe (the built-in Windows one, not the SysInternals Windows NT4 one, so make sure SysInternals comes last in your path) a volume, you have to run it with an elevated UAC Admin token.

But I just found out that you can do this without an Admin token:

C:\Windows\System32>Defrag.exe C: /t /v /u
Microsoft Drive Optimizer
Copyright (c) 2013 Microsoft Corp.

Tracking operation on (C:)...


Performing pass 2:
        Free Space Consolidation:  31% complete...

This makes it much easier to separate monitoring scripting from execution.

–jeroen

Posted in Batch-Files, Development, Scripting, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Windows 10 – language neutral batch file to start Windows

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/02/22

A while ago, I bitched that Microsoft moved away the Windows Update out of the Control panel into a language depended place (in Windows 10 1511 update broke the Hyper-V networking – Fix network connection issues).

Since then I had to maintain too many locales running Windows 10. So here is the batch file:

for /f "delims=" %%A in ('PowerShell -Command "(Get-Culture).Name"') do explorer "%LocalAppData%\Packages\windows.immersivecontrolpanel_cw5n1h2txyewy\LocalState\Indexed\Settings\%%A\AAA_SystemSettings_MusUpdate_UpdateActionButton.settingcontent-ms"

It uses these tricks:

  1. Set output of a command as a variable (in this case a for loop variable)
  2. Execute PowerShell script in a .bat file
  3. PowerShell Get-Culture (which gets a .NET CultureInfo instance)
  4. CultureInfo.Name property (which has the nl-NL, en-US, etc codes in it)

It replaced this simple batch-file which has worked for like 10 years:

%windir%\System32\rundll32.exe url.dll,FileProtocolHandler wuapp.exe

–jeroen

via: Windows Update Shortcut – Create in Windows 10 – Windows 10 Forums

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, Batch-Files, CommandLine, Development, Power User, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10 | Leave a Comment »

Windows batch file – setting space as delimiter when parsing files

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/01/04

for /f "tokens=* delims= " %%f in (myfile) do

If you put delims as the last parameter, then an ending space will be included as delimiter (at the start or in the middle it won’t).

A great tip by jeb and Joey in an answer for windows – Batch file FOR /f tokens – Stack Overflow

–jeroen

Posted in Batch-Files, Pingback, Scripting, Software Development, Stackoverflow | Leave a Comment »

Coping with UTF-16 / UCS-2 little endian in Batch files: numbers from WMIC

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/11/22

A while ago, I needed to get the various date, time and week values from WMIC to environment variables with pre-padded zeros. I thought: easy job, just write a batch file.

Tough luck: I couldn’t get the values to expand properly. Which in the end was caused by WMIC emitting UTF-16 and the command-interpreter not expecting double-byte character sets which messed up my original batch file.

What I wanted What I got
wmic_Day=21
wmic_DayOfWeek=04
wmic_Hour=15
wmic_Milliseconds=00
wmic_Minute=02
wmic_Month=05
wmic_Quarter=02
wmic_Second=22
wmic_WeekInMonth=04
wmic_Year=2015
Day=21
wmic_DayOfWeek=4
wmic_Hour=15
wmic_Milliseconds=
wmic_Minute=4
wmic_Month=5
wmic_Quarter=2
wmic_Second=22
wmic_WeekInMonth=4
wmic_Year=2015

WMIC uses this encoding because the Wide versions of Windows API calls use UTF-16 (sometimes called UCS-2 as that is where UTF-16 evolved from).

As Windows uses little-endian encoding by default, the high byte (which is zero) of a UTF-16 code point with ASCII characters comes first. That messes up the command interpreter.

Lucikly rojo was of great help solving this.

His solution is centered around set /A, which:

  • handles integer numbers and calls them “numeric” (hinting floating point, but those are truncated to integer; one of the tricks rojo uses)
  • and (be careful with this as 08 and 09 are not octal numbers) uses these prefixes:
    • 0 for Octal
    • 0x for hexadecimal

Enjoy and shiver with the online help extract:
Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Algorithms, Batch-Files, Development, Floating point handling, Scripting, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

permissions – recursively change owner windows 7 – Super User

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/10/27

Slightly updated the answer the /D Y part will recursively accept taking ownership when directory listing is denied in the permissions:

To fix really broken permissions, the best is to run these two commands one after the other:

takeown /F /D Y "C:\path\to\folder" /R
icacls "C:\path\to\folder" /reset /T

The first one will give you ownership of all the files, however that might not be enough, for example if all the files have the read/write/exec permissions set to “deny”. You own the files but still cannot do anything with them.

In that case, run the second command, which will fix the broken permissions.

via: permissions – recursively change owner windows 7 – Super User

–jeroen

Posted in Batch-Files, Development, Power User, Scripting, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 9, Windows Development, Windows Server 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Vista, Windows XP | Leave a Comment »

 
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