The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

  • My badges

  • Twitter Updates

  • My Flickr Stream

  • Pages

  • All categories

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,318 other followers

Archive for the ‘Encoding’ Category

email file decoding: Encode/Decode Quoted Printable – Webatic

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/03/26

For my link archive: [WayBack] Encode/Decode Quoted Printable – Webatic.

It did a splendid job at decoding email files in MIME format Quoted-printable.

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Communications Development, Development, eMail, Encoding, Internet, Internet protocol suite, Power User, sendmail, SMTP, SocialMedia, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

(mostly ASCII) List of emoticons – Wikipedia

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/03/17

Most searches for “ASCII emoticons” get you Unicode ones:

Luckily most are ASCII in List of emoticons – Wikipedia.

There are also shortcodes, which do not visually represent an emoji, but usually get translated to the image or Unicode character.

A few lists on them:

–jeroen

Posted in ASCII, Development, Encoding, LifeHacker, Power User, Software Development, Unicode | Leave a Comment »

Default XML encoding is UTF-8 (or better: utf-8). If it contains other byte sequences, this is an error.

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/01/21

I should have had the below answer when writing about StUF – receiving data from a provider where UTF-8 is in fact ISO-8859.

A while ago, a co-worker did not believe when I told that default XML encoding really is UTF-8 (and tried to force it to utf-8), and that if the content had byte sequences different from the (either specified or default) encoding, it was a problem.

I though I blogged about the default, and where to find it, but apparently, I did not.

My blog had (and has <g>) a truckload of articles mentioning UTF-8, less articles containing UTF-8, encoding and xml, but the ones having UTF-8, default, encoding and xml did not actually tell about a standard that really defines XML uses UTF-8 as default encoding when there is no other encoding information – like BOM (byte order mark), HTTP, or MIME encoding) available.

W3C indeed specifies it. [WayBack] utf 8 – How default is the default encoding (UTF-8) in the XML Declaration? – Stack Overflow has a summary (thanks James Holderness!):

The Short Answer

Under the very specific circumstances of a UTF-8 encoded document with no external encoding information (which I understand from the comments is what you’re interested in), there is no difference between the two declarations.

The long answer is far more interesting though.

and an elaboration:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Development, Encoding, Software Development, UTF-8, UTF8, XML, XML/XSD | Leave a Comment »

Unicode is hard, also for the Delphi compiler and IDE

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/10/13

The Delphi compiler does not see a unicode non-breaking space (0x00A0 as whitespace, and the Delphi IDE does not warn you about it: [WayBack] Delphi revelations #2 – Space characters are not just space characters.

Given that this character was introduced in 1993, I wonder how the compiler tests look like.

These also will not be recognised as whitespace:

Related, as many other tools also do not properly support various whitespace characters:

Via: [WayBack] A Delphi “Aha” experience – Kim Madsen – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in Delphi, Development, Software Development, Unicode | Leave a Comment »

Which encoding failure did encode “vóór” into “v3/43/4r”? – Stack Overflow

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/02/24

From quite some time ago, but still very relevant as encoding issues keep occurring:

A while ago, I saw the text “v3/43/4r” in a document.I know it comes from “vóór” (the acute accent emphasises in Dutch), and wonder which encoding failure was applied to get this wrong.

Source: [WayBackWhich encoding failure did encode “vóór” into “v3/43/4r”? – Stack Overflow

From the [WayBack] answer by rodrigo:

  • ó: is U+00F3, and occupies the same codepoint (0xF3) in a lot of different encodings (most ISO-8859-* and most western Windows-*).
  • In CP850 the codepint 0xF3 is ¾ (U+00BE), that is the three-quarters character. It is the same in other, less used, codepages (CP775, CP856, CP857, CP858).
  • The ¾ is sometimes transliterated to 3/4 when the character is not directly available.

And there you are! “vóór” -> “v¾¾r” -> “v3/43/4r”.

The first part (ó -> ¾) is the usual corruption of ANSI vs. OEM codepages in the Western Windows versions (in my country ANSI=Windows-1252, OEM=CP850). You can see it easily creating a file with NOTEPAD, writing vóór and dumping it in a command prompt with type.

–jeroen

Posted in CP850, Development, Encoding, Software Development, UTF-8, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

 
<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: