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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘UTF8’ Category

Which encoding failure did encode “vóór” into “v3/43/4r”? – Stack Overflow

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/02/24

From quite some time ago, but still very relevant as encoding issues keep occurring:

A while ago, I saw the text “v3/43/4r” in a document.I know it comes from “vóór” (the acute accent emphasises in Dutch), and wonder which encoding failure was applied to get this wrong.

Source: [WayBackWhich encoding failure did encode “vóór” into “v3/43/4r”? – Stack Overflow

From the [WayBack] answer by rodrigo:

  • ó: is U+00F3, and occupies the same codepoint (0xF3) in a lot of different encodings (most ISO-8859-* and most western Windows-*).
  • In CP850 the codepint 0xF3 is ¾ (U+00BE), that is the three-quarters character. It is the same in other, less used, codepages (CP775, CP856, CP857, CP858).
  • The ¾ is sometimes transliterated to 3/4 when the character is not directly available.

And there you are! “vóór” -> “v¾¾r” -> “v3/43/4r”.

The first part (ó -> ¾) is the usual corruption of ANSI vs. OEM codepages in the Western Windows versions (in my country ANSI=Windows-1252, OEM=CP850). You can see it easily creating a file with NOTEPAD, writing vóór and dumping it in a command prompt with type.

–jeroen

Posted in CP850, Development, Encoding, Software Development, UTF-8, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

Long read about Unicode: You, Me And The Emoji: Character Sets, Encoding And Emoji – Smashing Magazine

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/11/07

A well worth long rad:

We all recognize emoji. They’ve become the global pop stars of digital communication. But what are they, technically speaking? And what might we learn by taking a closer look at these images, characters, pictographs… whatever they are 🤔 (Thinking Face). We will dig deep to learn about how these thingamajigs work. Please note: Depending on your browser, you may not be able to see all emoji featured in this article (especially the Tifinagh characters). Also, different platforms vary in how they display emoji as well. That’s why the article always provides textual alternatives. Don’t let it discourage you from reading though! Now, let’s start with a seemingly simple question. What are emoji?

[WayBackYou, Me And The Emoji: Character Sets, Encoding And Emoji – Smashing Magazine

Via: [WayBack] Everything you ever wanted to know about characters, encodings, glyphs… and, oh yeah, emoji: bit.ly/2fNKeW3Long, rewarding read. – Ilya Grigorik – Google+

Here is just the ToC:

TABLE OF CONTENTS LINK

  1. Character Sets And Document Encoding: An Overview
    1. Characters
    2. Character Sets
    3. Coded Character Sets
    4. Encoding
  2. Declaring Character Sets And Document Encoding On The Web
    1. content-type HTTP Header Declaration
    2. Checking HTTP Headers Using A Browser’s Developer Tools
    3. Checking HTTP Headers Using Web-based Tools
    4. Using A Meta Element With charset Attribute
    5. An Encoding By Any Other Name
  3. What Were We Talking About Again? Oh Yeah, Emoji!
    1. So What Are Emoji?
    2. How Do We Use Emoji?
    3. Character References
    4. Glyphs
    5. How Do We Know If We Have These Symbols?
    6. The Great Emoji Proliferation Of 2016
  4. Emoji OS Support
    1. Emoji Support: Apple Platforms (macOS and iOS)
    2. Emoji Support: Windows
    3. Emoji Support: Linux
    4. Emoji Support: Android
  5. Emoji On The Web
    1. Emoji One
    2. Twemoji
  6. Conclusion

–jeroen

Posted in ASCII, Development, Encoding, ISO-8859, ISO8859, Shift JIS, Unicode, UTF-16, UTF-8, UTF16, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

Some notes on stripping NULL characters and BOMs from files

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/05/31

A while ago I bumped into applications that write alternating UTF-16 and UTF-8 to files without checking what type of encoding the files were using.

So here are some notes to at least save some of the contents.

TODO: figure out how to strip the BOM.

–jeroen

Posted in Development, Encoding, Software Development, UTF-16, UTF-8, UTF16, UTF8 | Leave a Comment »

Encoding is hard… so how did the single quote become a circumflexed a followed by Euro sign and trade mark?

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/10/04

A while ago (in fact more than a year), I posted Encoding is hard…  go G+ with the below picture.

ftfy (fixes text for you) fixes it, but:

How did the single quote become “’”?

Actually, because of a a common “beautification” of many Office suites (Microsoft and Open alike), the single quote was a special one: a Unicode Character ‘RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK’ (U+2019) which in UTF-8 is encoded as 0xE2 0x80 0x99.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Development, Encoding, ISO-8859, ISO8859, Software Development, Unicode, UTF-8, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

installing the UTF-8 encoding ftfy (fixes text for you) – via version 3.0 | Luminoso Blog

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/09/06

Simple if you know it:

pip install ftfy

That installs it as a command which is a lot easier than using it from Github at https://github.com/LuminosoInsight/python-ftfy

It knows how to solve the encoding issues in ÃƒÆ’ƒâ€šÃ‚ the future of publishing at W3C.

It didn’t solve my non-Unicode encoding issue: “v3/43/4r” -> “v¾¾r” -> “vóór”.

That was caused by an infamous Western Latin character set confusion issue, in this case ISO-8859/Windows- versus CP850/CP858 encoding issue (so: no Unicode involved at all, nor CP437 as it doesn’t have ¾).

So I put in a suggestion for ftfy to support finding the above.

–jeroen

via

Posted in Development, Encoding, Software Development, Unicode, UTF-8, UTF8 | 4 Comments »

 
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