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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘HTML5’ Category

HTML table border styles

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/01/20

I always get confused when I see this kind of HTML:

<td style="border: 1px black; border-style: none solid solid;">

This raises questions like:

  • When less than 4 borders are mentioned, which borders are solid, and which borders are none?
  • What is the order of 0…4 borders?

Luckily these links helped me:

  1. [WayBack] w3schools: CSS border-style property
  2. [WayBack] w3schools: CSS Borders
  3. [WayBack] border-style – CSS: Cascading Style Sheets | MDNThe border-style CSS property is a shorthand property that sets the line style for all four sides of an element’s border.

The first two made me find the last one, which is best as it has a CSS demo button (that also works on the WayBack link), a list of examples, and even better, answers the above questions with the “border-style” list below.

I rephrased their list into a table emphasising the clock-wise order:

The number of values determine the sides affected; thinking clock-wise is easiest to get it:

# values affected sides example top right bottom left
1 all: top, right, bottom, left solid solid solid solid solid
2 top & bottom, right & left none solid none solid none solid
3 top, right & left, bttom dotted none solid dotted none solid none
4 top, right, bottom, left double dotted solid none double dotted solid none

Their list:

The border-style property may be specified using one, two, three, or four values.

  • When one value is specified, it applies the same style to all four sides.
  • When two values are specified, the first style applies to the top and bottom, the second to the left and right.
  • When three values are specified, the first style applies to the top, the second to the left and right, the third to the bottom.
  • When four values are specified, the styles apply to the toprightbottom, and left in that order (clockwise).

Each value is a keyword chosen from the list below.

then it continues with a table showing the outcome of the various line style values you can put in:

<line-style>
Describes the style of the border. It can have the following values:

none
Like the hidden keyword, displays no border. Unless a background-image is set, the calculated value of border-top-width will be 0, even if the specified value is something else. In the case of table cell and border collapsing, the none value has the lowest priority: if any other conflicting border is set, it will be displayed.
hidden
Like the none keyword, displays no border. Unless a background-image is set, the calculated value of border-top-width will be 0, even if the specified value is something else. In the case of table cell and border collapsing, the hidden value has the highestpriority: if any other conflicting border is set, it won’t be displayed.
dotted
Displays a series of rounded dots. The spacing of the dots is not defined by the specification and is implementation-specific. The radius of the dots is half the calculated border-top-width.
dashed
Displays a series of short square-ended dashes or line segments. The exact size and length of the segments are not defined by the specification and are implementation-specific.
solid
Displays a single, straight, solid line.
double
Displays two straight lines that add up to the pixel size defined by border-width or border-top-width.
groove
Displays a border with a carved appearance. It is the opposite of ridge.
ridge
Displays a border with an extruded appearance. It is the opposite of groove.
inset
Displays a border that makes the element appear embedded. It is the opposite of outset. When applied to a table cell with border-collapse set to collapsed, this value behaves like groove.
outset
Displays a border that makes the element appear embossed. It is the opposite of inset. When applied to a table cell with border-collapse set to collapsed, this value behaves like ridge.

–jeroen

Posted in CSS, Development, HTML, HTML5, Software Development, Web Development | Leave a Comment »

Tables with two headers • Tables • WAI Web Accessibility Tutorials

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/12/08

Since I always forget that you can have any cell marked as th to make it a header: [WayBack] Tables with two headers • Tables • WAI Web Accessibility Tutorials.

This is not just limited to top rows, you can use it any where:

  • in the left column
  • in any other row
  • in any other column
  • in individual cells

In addition, a table can also have a caption, which is not just useful for screen-readers: it benefits general readability.

Quoting the page:

For such tables, use the <th> element to identify the header cells and the scope attribute to declare the direction of each header. The scopeattribute can be set to row or col to denote that a header applies to the entire row or column, respectively.

Additionally, you can use the <caption> element to identify the table in a document. This is particularly useful for screen-reader users browsing the web page in “table mode” where they can navigate from table to table.

Examples on that page:

–jeroen

Posted in Development, HTML, HTML5, Software Development, Web Development | Leave a Comment »

html – Is it possible to specify a starting number for an ordered list? – Stack Overflow

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/11/03

Since I keep forgetting this has been possible since the introduction of html 5: [WayBack] html – Is it possible to specify a starting number for an ordered list? – Stack Overflow:

If you need the functionality to start an ordered list (OL) at a specific point, you’ll have to specify your doctype as HTML 5; which is:

<!doctype html>

With that doctype, it is valid to set a start attribute on an ordered list. Such as:

<ol start="6">
  <li>Lorem</li>
  <li>Ipsum</li>
  <li>Dolor</li>
</ol>

–jeroen

Posted in Development, HTML, HTML5, Software Development, Web Development | Leave a Comment »

CSS flex-box layout – Wikipedia

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/09/02

Being a back-end and library person by heart, I am always late in the web-UI game, so this is on my list of things to try: CSS flex-box layout – Wikipedia.

I saw it being used by [WayBack] markdownlint demo: Demo for markdownlint, a Node.js style checker and lint tool for Markdown/CommonMark files.

Some links that should me help further:

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in CSS, Development, HTML, HTML5, Software Development, Web Development | Leave a Comment »

ls colour codes on OpenSuSE tumbleweed when accessed from Mac OS X ssh

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/06/07

`ls` colour codes

`ls` colour codes

I got confused as I thought red text would mean an error.

But they’re not: greenish yellow on a read background means error (a symbolic link to a place that’s no longer there).

It’s the output of https://github.com/gkotian/gautam_linux/blob/master/scripts/colours.sh as the one at

Actually the script is here https://raw.githubusercontent.com/gkotian/gautam_linux/master/scripts/colours.sh as the one at [WayBackcommand line – What do the different colors mean in the terminal? – Ask Ubuntu failed with errors like this one:

-bash: *.xbm: bad substitution

The full script output is below.

Since various terminals have a different mapping from colours in the ANSI escape code colour table, I used the standard HTML colours using (which slightly differs from the Terminal.app screenshot on the right):

References:

Note that the shell on Mac OS X uses a different way of configuring colours CLICOLOR as described in [WayBacksettings – CLICOLOR and LS_COLORS in bash – Unix & Linux Stack Exchange. I might cover that another day.

Script output:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, ANSI escape code, bash, CSS, Development, Encoding, HTML, HTML5, Linux, openSuSE, Power User, Software Development, SuSE Linux, Tumbleweed, Web Development | Leave a Comment »

 
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