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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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remanence of the PC computing past: Intel MCS-86 Assembly Language Reference Guide

Posted by jpluimers on 2012/09/24

Remanence of the PC computing past: Intel MCS-86 Assembly Language Reference Guide on bitsavers.org in http://bitsavers.org/pdf/intel/8086.

Intel MCS-86 is/was the 16-bit range of x86 processors.

I used it in BASM (not only in Delphi 1 and up, it started in Turbo Pascal 6), and before that in MASM, NASM, and TASM.

–jeroen

5 Responses to “remanence of the PC computing past: Intel MCS-86 Assembly Language Reference Guide”

  1. antonio said

    Back then it was easy to understand what was happening. Today it’s like pitching a tent on a sponge.

  2. C Johnson said

    And a notable mention to those of us who bashed in .Com files via debug!

  3. LDS said

    The instruction set is basically still the same – although registers got larger, their use freer, and optimizations far trickier. And sure, you have all the new (and complex) SSE instructions. And handcoded assembly is still useful, sometimes.

    • jpluimers said

      Agreed. That sometimes has decreased to about once or twice a year. But being able to read disassembled code is something I use far more often.
      –jeroen

  4. Ahh… The bad old days! How I want to forget them.

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