The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘BitSavers.org’ Category

Some links and references to IBM CUA: Common User Access which defines a lot of the UIs and UX we still use.

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/02/04

Back in the late 80s and early 90s of last century, engineers Richard E. Berry, Cliff J. Reeves set a standard that still influences the user interfaces and user experience of today: the IBM Common User Access.

I mentioned CUA a few times before, but since an old client of mine managed to throw away their paper originals in a “we don’t need that old stuff any more as we are now all digital” frenzy, I wanted to locate some PDFs. And I promised to write more about CUA.

If anyone has printed versions of the non-PDF documents below, please donate them to aek at bitsavers.org or scanning at archive.org as they are really hard to get.

A few search queries I used:

The PDFs I think are most interesting:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in BitSavers.org, Development, History, IBM SAA CUA, Keyboards and Keyboard Shortcuts, Power User, Software Development, UI Design, Usability, User Experience | 3 Comments »

2 More Old Micro Cornucopia issues on BitSavers from 1986 « The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/06/18

Almost two years ago, I wrote “the only issues missing are #28, #30 and #31.”. As of mid May any more:

All of them are from the 5th anniversary year.

–jeroen

via 2 More Old Micro Cornucopia issues on BitSavers from 1986 « The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff.

Posted in 6502 Assembly, Assembly Language, BitSavers.org, C, C++, Development, History, Pascal, Software Development, Turbo Pascal | Leave a Comment »

BitSavers.org just added 7 missing scans of PascalNews newsletters (1975…1983)

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/03/30

For anyone keeping up with Pascal history, these uploads are new:

–jeroen

via: Index of /pdf/pascalNews.

Posted in Apple Pascal, BitSavers.org, DEC Pascal, Delphi, Development, History, IBM Pascal, Pascal, Software Development, Standard Pascal, Turbo Pascal, UCSD Pascal | Leave a Comment »

Z80: the “User Manual” was already 300+ pages (:

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/08/14

Today yet another post in the series of BitSavers and History articles.

I already wrote a bit on the Z80 processor in XOR swap/exchange: nowadays an almost extinct means to exchange two distinct variables of the same size.

Popular Z80 powered computers were Amstrad CPCMSXExidy Sorcerer,  TRS-80P2000, Sinclair ZX80ZX81 and ZX SpectrumKayproOsborne 1 and the Z-80 SoftCard for Apple II.

The Z80 was widely popular in the 1980s as it could do more than the MOS 6502 of that time:

Still the XOR swap algorithm was used a lot back then because of register pressure in the Z80.

Compared to current processors you’d think the Z80 was so small that a few pages of documentation would suffice.

Not so: back then they had a truckload of documentation and it would all be on paper (PDF ame in 1993 and it took quite a while to become popular).

Some of the Z80 documentation has found its way to BitSavers.org:

–jeroen

Posted in Assembly Language, BitSavers.org, Development, History, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Apple I Cassette Interface Documentation at bitsavers (Apple 1, not Apple 2); #6502, @IlRoberto, @mos65o2

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/03/15

The BitSavers /pdf/apple/apple_I directory now contains a PDF of the Apple I Cassette Interface Documentation.

Awesome history (:

It even has this very old Apple address on it:

 

APPLE COMPUTER COMPANY
770 Welch Road,
Suite 154
Palo Alto,
California 94304
Phone: (415) 326-4248 

 

(both the address and phone now have different owners now).

–jeroen

 

Posted in Apple, BitSavers.org, History, Power User | Leave a Comment »

 
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