The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

  • My badges

  • Twitter Updates

  • My Flickr Stream

  • Pages

  • All categories

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,481 other followers

Archive for the ‘Assembly Language’ Category

Moore’s law has almost ended: back to the future

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/09/29

[WayBack] We’re approaching the limits of computer power – we need new programmers now | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

Ever-faster processors led to bloated software, but physical limits may force a return to the concise code of the past

So back to optimisation and maybe even assembly language.

Which brings back the days gone by.

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Algorithms, Assembly Language, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

A Tale of Many Divisions – Naive Prime Factorization Across a Handful of Architectures

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/06/16

[WayBack] A Tale of Many Divisions – Naive Prime Factorization Across a Handful of Architectures

Source code: [WayBack] GitHub – blu/euclid: An extremely naive prime factorizer

Via: [WayBack] Blu looks at how a small piece of code with divisions surprisingly behave on various architecture: #Arm, #MIPS, and #x86. – Jean-Luc Aufranc – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in Assembly Language, C++, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Insentricity :: Kermit on the JAIR 8080 ::

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/05/22

Cool: [WayBackInsentricity :: Kermit on the JAIR 8080 ::

Repository: [WayBackFozzTexx/Kermit-CPM: Columbia University’s Kermit for CP/M

–jeroen

Posted in Assembly Language, Development, History, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Some notes on loosing performance because of using AVX

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/03/20

It looks like AVX can be a curse most of the times. Below are some (many) links that lead me to this conclusion, based on a thread started by Kelly Sommers.

My conclusion

Running AVX instructions will affect the processor frequency, which means that non-AVX code will slow down, so you will only benefit when the gain of using AVX code outweighs the non-AVX loss on anything running on that processor in the same time frame.

In practice, this means you need to long term gain from AVX on many cores. If you don’t, then the performance penalty on all cores, including the initial AVX performance, will degrade, often a lot (dozens of %).

Tweets and pages linked by them

Kelly raised a bunch of interesting questions and remarks because of the above:

I collected the above links because of [WayBack] GitHub – maximmasiutin/FastMM4-AVX: FastMM4 fork with AVX support and multi-threaded enhancements (faster locking), where it is unclear which parts of the gains are because of AVX and which parts are because of other optimizations. It looks like that under heavy loads on data center like conditions, the total gain is about 30%. The loss for traditional processing there has not been measured, but from the above my estimate it is at least 20%.

Full tweets below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Assembly Language, Development, Software Development, x64, x86 | Leave a Comment »

performance – Why is this C++ code faster than my hand-written assembly for testing the Collatz conjecture? – Stack Overflow

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/02/28

Geek pr0n at [WayBackperformance – Why is this C++ code faster than my hand-written assembly for testing the Collatz conjecture? – Stack Overflow

Via: [WayBack] Very nice #Geekpr0n “Why is C++ faster than my hand-written assembly code?” The comments are of high quality i… – Jan Wildeboer – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in Assembly Language, C, C++, Development, Software Development, x64, x86 | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: