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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for August 26th, 2016

Invite people to a Google Hangouts session with you by constructing a manual invitation URL

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/08/26

Cool:

Did you know that you could share a link to let people chat with you in Hangouts?

We use these links for certain invites, but they work if you hand build them and share them too.

https://hangouts.google.com/chat/person/ 111111111111

Where the number is your profile id

With vanity urls it’s harder to find that, but the easiest way is to use the public api call here https://developers.google.com/+/web/api/rest/latest/people/get#try-it.
Put “me” into the userId field and it will output your numerical id in the response.

Enter `id` in the `fields` to limit the JSON

Enter `id` in the `fields` to limit the JSON

By constructing such an invitation URL you can get people to directly start a Google Hangouts chat with you.

The above steps will give you a lot of JSON output which includes an id field somewhere in the middle. With one more trick you can get just the id field.

You can limit the output by putting id in the fields to request as the image on the right shows.

Sometimes clicking on G+ posts, you even get the id for free, I’m just not sure under what circumstances G+ builds a G+ URL with username or with id.

–jeroen

Source: We have made a number of changes internally to Hangouts…

via:

Posted in Google, GoogleHangouts, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Webserver cipher hardening links

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/08/26

There are quite a few pages on Webserver Cypher Hardening. This is yet another one born because I didn’t know how to compare these lists and why they were so different.

Apparently, OpenSSL has various ways of naming (groups of) cyphers. OpenSSL also disregards any cyphers it doesn’t have.

Basically there are two far ends for cypher lists:

  1. Fully name all cyphers and their order: long list fine grained control
  2. Name groups including group order and let OpenSSL expand the groups: short list but coarse grained control.

A way to compere them using openssl ciphers -V is answered at ssl – Hardening web server cyphers: which cypher list to choose, or how to map between Mozilla and Hynek – Server Fault.

Some of the cypher lists I found:

There are two great SSL tests I found out. The first one is online, the second one from the shell.

  1. SSL Labs:
  2. shell based SSL/TLS tester: testssl.sh.

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, OpenSSL, Power User, Security | Leave a Comment »

 
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