The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

  • My badges

  • Twitter Updates

  • My Flickr Stream

  • Pages

  • All categories

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,702 other followers

Archive for November 16th, 2018

nmap for Windows: ncat as a TCP client to servers

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/11/16

Downloads are from a bit cryptic page [WayBack] Download the Free Nmap Security Scanner for Linux/Mac/Windows via [WayBack] Windows | Nmap Network Scanning.

An alternative is to go to [WayBack] nmap.org/dist, then search for the bottom most files having .exe or .zip extensions.

It is much more modern than netcat (see some links on that below) and has elaborate documentation:

As a comparison some netcat links:

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, nmap, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Convert/adapt an old ATX Power Supply into a Bench Power Supply with (or without) 3D Printed Parts

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/11/16

An interesting idea, although I would slightly modify it so I can -12V and -5V as well and maybe other voltage combinations too:

They are based on these underlying links:

Note that some of the newer power supplies with 24-pin molex connectors do not give you -5V any more.

A few notes:

  • depending on the age, ATX supplies can get you these voltages: -12V, -5V, 0V, +3.3V, +5V, +12V
    • -12V and -5V have very limited currents
    • newer power supplies often do not have -5V (especially the ones having 24-pin connectors)
    • newer power supplies have limited +5V power, but higher +12V power
    • older power supplies have limited +12V power, but higher +5V power
  • always take pictures of all connectors and the wire colours connected to them before starting (especially before cutting any wires)
    • this allows you to find back:
      • non-standard wire colours
      • configurations not covered here
  • to get stable 12V, you need a 5V load of about 5W:
    • between RED (+5V) andBLACK (GND),
    • for instance with pin 3 and pin 4,
    • or over one of the molex/floppy connectors: pins RED-BLACK
    • as load,
      • use at least a 10V/10W resistor or 12v/10W halogen lamp
      • ensure they are cooled well
  • to get stable 12V, you need a 12V load of about 10W
    • between YELLOW (+12V) andBLACK (GND),
    • for instance with pin 10 and pin 17,
    • or over one of the molex/floppy connectors: pins YELLOW-BLACK
    • as load,
      • use at least a 20V/20W resistor or 12v/20W halogen lamp
      • ensure they are cooled well
  • if your power supply has a BROWN (+3.3VS),
    • then ensure it is connected to ORANGE (+3.3V)
      • as brown is the SENSING wire to check 3.3V is OK.
  • to turn the power supply on,
    • short GREEN (PWR_ON, pin 14) and BLACK (GND, pin 15)
  • to know when the power is on:
    • connect a LED via a resistor between GREY (PWR_OK, pin 8) and BLACK (GND, pin 7)
  • to know when there is mains power:
    • connect a LED via a resistor between PURPLE (+5VSB, pin 9: stand by) and BLACK (GND, pin 7 or pin17)
  • Wikipedia: ATX Power supply describes
    • PWR_OK (often called Power Good)
    • +5VSB (stand by)
  • read the specs of your power supply to understand how much current it can deliver on which lines
  • some more current information

Example for loads: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKgziA46wFY; more on why you need them and how to choose:

With a few more modifications you can [WayBack] Convert a Computer Power Supply to a Variable Bench Top Lab Power Supply.

I will probably go for this solution as it is easier to swap power supplies.

–jeroen

Via: [WayBack] Nice recycling of an old ATX power supply with a 3D printed part and a few accessories and cables… – Jean-Luc Aufranc – Google+

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Development, Hardware Development | 1 Comment »

Timestamp Generator / Converter – Timestampgenerator.com

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/11/16

I wish Google Search would return this when asking for “current time in ISO 8601”: [WayBackTimestamp Generator / Converter – Timestampgenerator.com

Type Value
Timestamp 1497872708
Server time 2017-06-19T11:52:55+00:00
ISO 8601 2017-06-19T11:45:08+00:00
RFC 2822 Mon, 19 Jun 2017 11:45:08 +0000
Day of the Week Monday
+1 Hour 1497876308
+1 Day 1497959108
+1 Week 1498477508
+1 Month 1500464708
+1 Year 1529408708

–jeroen

Posted in ISO 8601, LifeHacker, Power User | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: