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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for August 9th, 2019

PlasticSCM console

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/09

The cm.exe by default is not on the path, even though it is a useful tool.

Some links on it:

Slow

One drawback: the cm.exe is slow in startup, likely because it is a .NET executable needing quite a few assemblies to load:

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v10.0A\bin\NETFX 4.7.1 Tools\CorFlags.exe" "C:\Program Files\PlasticSCM5\client\cm.exe"
Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CorFlags Conversion Tool. Version 4.7.2558.0
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Version : v4.0.30319
CLR Header: 2.5
PE : PE32
CorFlags : 0x1
ILONLY : 1
32BITREQ : 0
32BITPREF : 0
Signed : 0

Finding stuff

I get a feeling that there is quite a bit of cm functionality either undocumented, or hardly documented.

For instance, copying a title from the PlasticSCM GUI does not mean it will work as a cm command.

Despite the documentation indicating

When you run queries using comparison operators (>, <, >=, <=) from the command line, remember that the shell considers these operators as IO redirections, so you will need to enclose the queries with quotation marks:
cm find "branches where owner='pablo' and changesets >= '2013/03/01'"

you have to be really careful where to put the starting double quote: it has to be after the find command:

  1. Example 1
    • Title
      User query: find changeset where branch='/main/test/My Branch Name' on repository 'Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088' (22 Items - 0 selected)
    • Failure
      "C:\Program Files\PlasticSCM5\client\cm.exe" "find changeset where branch='/main/test/My Branch Name' on repository 'Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088'"
      Command 'find changeset where branch='/main/test/My Branch Name' on repository 'Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088'' not found. Type cm showcommands to get a command list.
    • Success
      "C:\Program Files\PlasticSCM5\client\cm.exe" find "changeset where branch='/main/test/My Branch Name' on repository 'Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088'"
  2. Example 2
    • Title
      Changesets /main/test/My Branch Name@Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088 (4 Items - 1 selected)
    • Failure
      "C:\Program Files\PlasticSCM5\client\cm.exe" find "Changesets /main/test/My Branch Name@Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088"
      Error: unexpected char: '@'
    • Success
      "C:\Program Files\PlasticSCM5\client\cm.exe" find "Changesets where branch='/main/test/My Branch Name' on repository 'Projects@ssl://plastic.example.org:8088'"

This means that changeset can be Changesets: it is case insensitive and has multiple aliases. It looks similar to commands I used in my days of using Rational ClearCase РWikipedia

I need to find out how to translate a non-query title into a query one. That will make it a lot easier to go from PlasticSCM GUI to the cm.

No XML documentation

The cm find command has a cool parameter --xml, which dumps the output in an XML tree.

My original goal was to see if I could turn the XML into something like Markdown or RST, using an XSLT transform like these:

For those transforms, you have to know how the input XML is structured. However, this information is undocumented.

When asked, PlasticSCM indicated there is no XSD for it claiming it was “super simple export to XML”:

[WayBack] Plastic SCM on Twitter: “No XSD, I’m afraid. Just super simple export to XML.‚Ķ “

https://twitter.com/plasticscm/status/1039842761304940544

I hoped the elements were just uppercase versions of the output below, but they are not. Bummer.

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Development, PlasticSCM, Power User, Source Code Management | Leave a Comment »

Periodic Table of Motion

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/09

Cool [WayBack] motiontable showcasing many graphical transformation motions in a way similar to the Periodic Table of Elements.

More in depth information (in Japanese, but Google Translate performs a great job) at:

  • [WayBack] About¬†(also explaining the similarity of both tables, for instance on how columns and rows are organised)
  • [WayBack] Work List¬†showing the effects of many transformations applied to various graphic designs

Via [WayBack] Motion Periodic Table http://foxcodex.html.xdomain.jp/index.html #gamedev РAdrian Marius Popa РGoogle+

–jeroen

Posted in Graphic Design, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Dean Bubley’s Disruptive Wireless: Debunking the Network QoS myth

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/09

QoS doesn’t work, except for one specific scenario:

Where QoS works is where one organisation controls both ends of a connection AND also tightly-defines and controls the applications:

  • A fixed-broadband provider can protect IP telephony & IPTV on home broadband between central office & the home gateway.An enterprise can build a private network & prioritise its most important application(s), plus maybe a connection to a public cloud or UCaaS service.
  • Mobile operators can tune a 4G network to prioritise VoLTE.
  • Telco core and transport networks can apply differential QoS to particular wholesale customers, or to their own various retail requirements (eg enterprise users’ data vs. low-end consumers, or cell-site timing signals and backhaul vs. user data).
  • Industrial process & control systems use a variety of special realtime connection protocols and networks. Vendors of “OT” (operational technology) tend to view IT/telecoms and TCP/IP as quaint. The IT/OT boundary is the real “edge”.

Source: [WayBack]¬†Dean Bubley’s Disruptive Wireless: Debunking the Network QoS myth

Via: [WayBack] This is not news, but it’s worthwhile repeating… – Kristian K√∂hntopp – Google+:

This is not news, but it’s worthwhile repeating: it is actually cheaper to build a network that can carry the traffic than building a network that keeps quality promises on a backbone that is undersized or close to capacity. Overprovisioning works, everything else does not, economically as well as technically.

–jeroen

Posted in Network-and-equipment, Power User, QoS | Leave a Comment »

 
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