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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for February 3rd, 2020

Those nice User Experiences: two shortcuts binding to Alt-O on the Dutch Windo…

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/02/03

[WayBack] Those nice User Experiences: two shortcuts binding to Alt-O on the Dutch Windows 10 translation… – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+

I know it is hard to do UX, but at least test your translations.

–jeroen

Posted in Usability, User Experience (ux) | Leave a Comment »

Managing sendmail TLS authenticated users

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/02/03

A few notes for managing the users that should be allowed to send mail via sendmail using TLS authentication.

Most of it is derived/summarised for [WayBack] SMTP AUTH in sendmail 8.10-8.13 and [WayBack] Creating Users for a Postfix-Based Mail Relay – Scott’s Weblog – The weblog of an IT pro specializing in cloud computing, virtualization, and networking, all with an open source view

  1. Verify your sendmail allows TLS:
    # sendmail -d0.1 -bv | grep SASL
    NETUNIX NEWDB NIS NISPLUS PIPELINING SASLv2 SCANF SOCKETMAP
  2. The list of TLS authentication users differs from the ones in /etc/passwd
  3. The tools and files manage if  the output is SASLv2 or older. For SASLv2 they are:
    • /etc/sasldb2 has the users/passwords
    • sasldblistusers2 lists the users
    • saslpasswd2 manages users

For instance, this commands creates a new user for use with sendmail:

# saslpasswd2 -c -u example.org firstname.lastname
Password:
Again (for verification):

sasldblistusers2

firstname.lastname@example.org: userPassword

cat /etc/sasldb2

....................firstname.lastname@example.orguserPassword

For future reading:

I thought I needed this so I could add an alias @pluimers.com to my gmail box, as I read only the accepted answer at [WayBack] Add new alias to Gmail without SMTP (forwarding-only address) – Web Applications Stack Exchange pointing to:

I should have read the second answer at [WayBack] Add new alias to Gmail without SMTP (forwarding-only address) – Web Applications Stack Exchange:

As of writing, however, you can simply use the Gmail SMTP server, as long as you use [WayBackGoogle two-step authentication.

So just for completeness, the full steps:

  1. Gmail settings, Accounts and Import tab.
  2. Add another email address you own
  3. Type name and email address to be added.
  4. For SMTP Server, put smtp.gmail.com
  5. For Username, your full Gmail address including @gmail.com
  6. For password, provide an App Password generated in Google Accounts at https://security.google.com/settings/security/apppasswords
  7. Leave Secured connection using TLS selected as is.
  8. Add Account

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Power User, sendmail | Leave a Comment »

Fixing “one or more critical volumes is not having enough free space” also known as 0x81000033 during Windows backup

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/02/03

If you get this error:

Backup and Restore failed and you receive the following error message: The backup did not complete successfully. Check your backup: Windows Backup skipped backing up system image because one or more critical volumes is not having enough free space.

then you are dealing with error 0x81000033 which usually means your SYSTEM RESERVED partition is full, but might happen on other volumes you are backing up as well.

Windows tries to trick your mind, as the error actually indicates the disk you make your backup to, but in fact it is about one or more of the disks you are backing up.

Most often, this is the hidden partition SYSTEM RESERVED (sometimes called System Reserved):

The SYSTEM RESERVED partition (~100 megabyte on systems originally installed with Windows < 8 and ~350 megabyte afterwards) contains files relating to boot, recovery and BitLocker drive encryption. You find more information about it here:

The minimum free size for volumes when using Windows backup are these:

  • volumes less than 500 megabytes: 50 megabytes free space
  • between 500 megabytes and 1 gigabytes: 320 megabytes of free space
  • more than 1 gigabytes: at least 1 gigabyte of free space

That was indeed the case on my disk:

Freeing space on the System Reserved volume

A quick search for 0x81000033 reveals space issues usually are about the USN Journal which you can configuring using fsutil.

Even though the documentation doesn’t tell, fsutil accepts not just a drive letter as VolumePath, but also a VolumeName. [WayBack] 1_multipart_xF8FF_3_WolfC07.pdf (Chapter 7 of “Troubleshooting Microsoft Technologies: The Ultimate Administrator’s Repair Manual“) gets that right:

volumepath … specify the path to a logical volume (drive letter, mount path, volume name).

So you do not need a drive letter to disable the USN journal, the volumename suffices.

This volume name is the unique NTFS identification for a volume: [WayBack] NTFS Curiosities (part 2): Volumes, volume names and mount points – Antimail

You can find the volume name inside PowerShell by using Get-Volume | Format-List, then on an administrative command prompt running this:

fsutil usn deletejournal /D \\?\Volume{b41b0670-0000-0000-00e8-0e8004000000}\

In my case this wasn’t enough, so I had to assign a drive letter to see that there was a snapshots directory in the root:

Deleting that directory solved the problem.

Related articles:

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 | Leave a Comment »

 
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