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Archive for the ‘ESXi4’ Category

ESXi: for my link archive – links about “vim-cmd vmsvc/message” (lots of interesting scripts for deployment scenarios)

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/02/16

In ESXi: on the console/ssh, when a moved VM pauses during power-on: show which VMs have messages waiting, then answer them, I searched for [Wayback] “vim-cmd vmsvc/message” – Google Search in order to see which messages were available.

That search revealed a lot more links, so here are the ones I found most interesting:

 

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Power User, ESXi4, VMware, VMware ESXi, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, Virtualization, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, ESXi6.7, ESXi7 | Leave a Comment »

ESXi: for my link archive “Developing for VMware ESXi”

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/02/15

This post amends the post last week on rsync backup of your ESXi box: How to make a statically linked rsync binary « The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff.

Two weeks ago, I posted about Source: ESXi: searching for “vim-cmd vmsvc/message” lead me to the “Managing ESXi Without VI Client” series of blog posts.

It got me looking more deeply in the VM-Help site, and I found [Wayback] Developing for VMware ESXi – Virtual Machine and VPS Tutorials, for which I have materialised the links below and checked their WayBack machine status.

Compiling Utilities for ESXi

Given that ESXi is not based on Linux you won’t find any installer which you could use to install any Linux components that you might want to add to ESXi. However, ESXi does make use of a number of Open Source packages such as OpenSSL, Python, and Openwsman (WS-Management). The key to compiling a utility for ESXi is creating a statically linked version of the tool. With a statically linked version, there are no dependencies on other libraries that may not be present on ESXi. The downside to this method of compiling is that the utility may be larger than a dynamically linked version. With a dynamically linked version the utility assumes that other libraries are present and can rely on subroutines within those libraries.

Compiling rsync – [Wayback] How to compile a statically linked rsync binary for ESXi
Compiling Busybox – [Wayback] How to compile Busybox for ESXi … kind of Part 1
Discussion of compiling UNFS – http://www.vm-help.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=2280&p=10185&e=10185 (not archived in the WayBack machine nor available on-line)
Notes on compling binaries – [Wayback] Stjepan Groš – Homepage

Compiling Drivers for ESXi

Given the common misunderstanding that ESXi is Linux based, a new user often inquires about the process of copying a Linux driver to their ESXi install. This is not possible. ESXi includes a Linux driver compatibility module. This allows for Linux source code to be used to compile drivers for ESXi, but the drivers are still specific to ESXi. The following links provides some samples and notes for compiling drivers for ESXi.

Compiling a Silicon Image 3132 driver – [Archive.is] Wayback: Adding Driver Support to VMware ESXi 4 | Tip’s Notebook
Compiling a Marvell sky2 driver – [Wayback] Using a Marvell LAN card with ESXi 4 – KernelCrash

(Note: This post was initially written when ESXi 4.0 was available. As of late 2010, ESXi 4.1 has been released, and it does actually include a sky2 driver that may or may not work with various Marvell LAN chipsets. The post is still relevant (especially the comments)  if your particular Marvell chipset does not work with the sky2 driver in ESXI 4.1. Also, the post is relevant if you’re interested in porting other network drivers to ESXi)

Open Virtualization Drivers development notes

Being from the ESXi 4 and 5 era, the links seem to hold up remarkably well. Despite ESXi 3 being Linux based (see [Archive.is] VMware ESX Server – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), as opposed to ESXi 4 and up that run a microkernel, Linux based tools still can be used to develop tooling and drivers.

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, ESXi4, VMware, VMware ESXi, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, Virtualization, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, ESXi6.7, ESXi7 | Leave a Comment »

ESXi: searching for “vim-cmd vmsvc/message” lead me to the “Managing ESXi Without VI Client” series of blog posts

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/02/02

Last week, I wrote about ESXi: on the console/ssh, when a moved VM pauses during power-on: show which VMs have messages waiting, then answer them.

The “vim-cmd vmsvc/message” – Google Search there lead me to this very interesting series of blog posts on managing ESXi Without VI Client.

It was written in the ESXi 4 and 5 era (for a time-frame, see [Wayback] VMware ESXi Release and Build Number History | virten.net) where VIC – the [Wayback] VMware Infrastructure Client, later named VC:  [Wayback] vSphere Client – ruled.

The series content holds remarkably well now that VIC/VC got first replaced by the [Wayback] vSphere Web Client (often called [Wayback] vSphere HTML 5 Client and started out of the [Wayback] ESXi Embedded Host Client fling).

Anyway, here are the posts in the series:

  1. [Wayback] Managing ESXi Without the VI Client – Part 1 – Virtual Machine and VPS Tutorials – initial setup and creating a VM
  2. [Wayback] Managing ESXi Without the VI Client – Part 2 – Virtual Machine and VPS Tutorials – add a license key, enable VM automatic startup and shutdown and unregister a VM
  3. [Wayback] Managing ESXi without the VI Client – Part 3 – Virtual Machine and VPS Tutorials – create a virtual switch and configure a firewall VM
  4. [Wayback] Managing ESXi without the VI Client – Part 4 – Virtual Machine and VPS Tutorials – install an update for ESXi
  5. [Wayback] Managing ESXi Without VI Client – Part 5 – Virtual Machine and VPS Tutorials – creating a datastore, then moving a VM between datastores

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, ESXi4, VMware, VMware ESXi, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, Virtualization, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, ESXi6.7, ESXi7 | Leave a Comment »

Always use SCSI for your VM guest disks – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/20

Rephrased from [WayBackJeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+:

If you install a virtual machine, ensure the disk controller and disks are SCSI based.

This has many advantages, including:

  • speed (usually the SCSI drivers can be paravirtualised)
  • hot addition of new disks

It holds for virtually any virtualization platform including all non-ancient (less than ~10 year old) versions of:

  • VMware (Workstation, Viewer, but I expect this also to work on vSphere, ESXI, Fusion)
  • Hyper-V
  • KVM (and therefore Proxmox)
  • VirtualBox

Based on my notes in the above link and the links below:

Note this isn’t just for Linux guests/hosts: Most guests (including Windows) can do a SCSI bus re-scan and detect new SCSI devices.

The trick here is that the guest must already have a virtual SCSI controller (adding that will require a reboot of the guest).

Then adding a new SCSI disk on that controller from any host (Windows, Mac, ESXi, vSphere) should work fine.

–jeroen

Posted in ESXi4, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, Fusion, Hyper-V, KVM Kernel-based Virtual Machine, Power User, Proxmox, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

VMFS metadata files

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/05/09

For my own ference:

disk space under VMFS-3 is organized according to four resource types. They are : blocks, sub-blocks, pointer blocks, and file descriptors. Resources are grouped into clusters, which form cluster groups. Every resource type is administered by one or a number of system files. Lets have a look at what those abbreviated file names stand for:

  • fbb.sf = file block bitmap.sf
  • fdc.sf = file descriptor cluster.sf
  • pbc.sf = pointer block cluster.sf
  • sbc.sf = sub-block cluster.sf
  • vh.sf = volume header.sfs
  • dd.sf = scsi device description.sf

The VMFS-5 uses one more system file:

  • pb2.sf = pointer block 2.sf

Source: [Archive.isVMFS metadata files

Posted in ESXi4, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

 
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