The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

  • My badges

  • Twitter Updates

  • My Flickr Stream

  • Pages

  • All categories

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,046 other followers

Archive for the ‘VirtualBox’ Category

When using a e1000 virtual network adapter under VMware, use the “Intel PRO/1000 MT Server (82545EM)” under Virtual Box

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/04/17

Every now and then I need to run existing VMware based disk under a different virtualisation environment.

In my case, the target was VirtualBox, and the source used a e1000 virtual network adapter.

You find the required settings to migrate to VirtualBox by running this inside the directory of your VMware virtual machine:

grep ethernet *vmx

It gives output like this:

ethernet0.present = "TRUE"
ethernet0.virtualDev = "e1000"
ethernet0.networkName = "VM Network on LAN"
ethernet0.addressType = "generated"
ethernet0.generatedAddress = "00:0c:29:cc:cc:cc"
ethernet0.pciSlotNumber = "32"
ethernet0.generatedAddressOffset = "0"

This is in fact an “Intel 82545EM Gigabit Ethernet NIC” adapter, which VirtualBox calls “Intel PRO/1000 MT Server (82545EM)”.

Another compatible pair is the VMware vlance or “AMD 79C970 PCnet32- LANCE NIC” which VirtualBox calls “AMD PCNet PCI II (Am79C970A)”

First note:

Often the virtual operating system still recognises it as a different adapter. Sometimes you can prevent this by also copying the MAC address (as VirtualBox by default uses a MAC address like 080027CCCCCC.

If it is still wrong, then read [WayBack] PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames: the various ways of assigning network interface names in virtualisation environments tend to mismatch. To fix this, I had to rename /etc/sysconfig/ifcfg-ens32 to the nee interface name I found via if -a.

Second note:

VMware supports two special virtual networks that are accessible from the host: vmnet1 (host-only) and vmnet8(NAT) : both are accessible from the host as VMware installs special network adapters:

  • vmnet1 is the host-only network where the host can talk to the VMs and vice versa, but the hosts cannot talk to the outside world
  • vmnet8 is the NAT network where the host can talk to the VMs and vice versa, but the hosts can talk to the outside world

Some background info at:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Power User, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware | Leave a Comment »

Some links that should me help shrinking the virtual disk files of Windows VMs

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/04/03

With virtual disks, at least these three levels are involved:

  • partition or volume (often called drive) size
  • virtual disk size
  • virtual disk backing store size

When talking about shrinking disks, they usually explain about below steps, assuming there is a 1:1:1 mapping of the above and backing store of the disk is dynamically growing:

  1. defragment the files on a partition/volume
  2. zero-fill the non-used space
  3. shrink the virtual disk assuming it is a dynamically growing one

For various reasons, virtualisation environments can have pre-allocated virtual disks ensuring the space on the backing store is firmly reserved.

One such occasion can be in VMware (often required for instance with vSphere/ESXi/ESX based infrastructure, but can also be used in Workstation/Fusion/Player) or Virtual Box in fixed disk mode (default there is dynamic).

Here are some links that should me help shrink in those situations:

More on conversion:

–jeroen

PS: a useful tip by Joe C. Hecht on shrinking:

Oh… On shrinking VM Disks, I make a new growable disk, then use a utility to “smart copy” the partions to the new disk (then replace the disk files in the VM). The “smart copy” just copies the file system – IE what is used (I use an old copy of Paragon Hard Drive Manager). It works out a lot better than writing “zeros”. I then make a compressed image of the whole VM using  rar5 compression with a 1GB dictionary size. I then have batch files that can unrar the VM’s on a moments notice (from a collection of over 300).

Posted in Fusion, Power User, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

Always use SCSI for your VM guest disks – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/20

Rephrased from [WayBackJeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+:

If you install a virtual machine, ensure the disk controller and disks are SCSI based.

This has many advantages, including:

  • speed (usually the SCSI drivers can be paravirtualised)
  • hot addition of new disks

It holds for virtually any virtualization platform including all non-ancient (less than ~10 year old) versions of:

  • VMware (Workstation, Viewer, but I expect this also to work on vSphere, ESXI, Fusion)
  • Hyper-V
  • KVM (and therefore Proxmox)
  • VirtualBox

Based on my notes in the above link and the links below:

Note this isn’t just for Linux guests/hosts: Most guests (including Windows) can do a SCSI bus re-scan and detect new SCSI devices.

The trick here is that the guest must already have a virtual SCSI controller (adding that will require a reboot of the guest).

Then adding a new SCSI disk on that controller from any host (Windows, Mac, ESXi, vSphere) should work fine.

–jeroen

Posted in ESXi4, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, Fusion, Hyper-V, KVM, Power User, Proxmox, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

airbus-seclab/crashos

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/10/30

Cool repository, but contact your cloud provider before trying…: [WayBackairbus-seclab/crashos.

via:

–jeroen

Posted in Fusion, Hyper-V, KVM, Power User, Proxmox, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

Check If A Linux System Is Physical Or Virtual Machine

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/10/08

One day I am going to try to extend this for a few other virtualisation environments and Linux distributions: [WayBack] Check If A Linux System Is Physical Or Virtual Machine

Via: [WayBack] Check If A Linux System Is Physical Or Virtual Machine #Linux – Joe C. Hecht – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Fusion, Hyper-V, KVM, Power User, Proxmox, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: