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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘VMware Workstation’ Category

airbus-seclab/crashos

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/10/30

Cool repository, but contact your cloud provider before trying…: [WayBackairbus-seclab/crashos.

via:

–jeroen

Posted in Fusion, Hyper-V, KVM, Power User, Proxmox, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

Check If A Linux System Is Physical Or Virtual Machine

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/10/08

One day I am going to try to extend this for a few other virtualisation environments and Linux distributions: [WayBack] Check If A Linux System Is Physical Or Virtual Machine

Via: [WayBack] Check If A Linux System Is Physical Or Virtual Machine #Linux – Joe C. Hecht – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Fusion, Hyper-V, KVM, Power User, Proxmox, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

SysInternals sdelete: zero wipe free space is called -z instead of -c

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/09/20

In the 2009 past, sdelete used the -c parameter to zero wipe clean a hard drive and -z would clean it with a random pattern.

That has changed. Somewhere along the lines, -c and -z has swapped meaning which I didn’t notice.

This resulted in many of my virtual machines image backups were a lot larger than they needed to be.

The reason is that now:

  • -c does a clean free space with a random DoD conformant pattern (which does not compress well)
  • -z writes zeros in the free space

Incidently, -c is a lot slower than -z as well.

TL;DR: use this command

sdelete -z C:

Where C: is the drive to zero clean the free space.

–jeroen

Posted in Batch-Files, Development, Fusion, Hyper-V, Power User, Proxmox, Scripting, sdelete, Software Development, SysInternals, View, VirtualBox, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation, Windows | Leave a Comment »

Skype Mix Minus – via: Joe Hecht – Google+

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/02/25

Joe Hecht on Skype Mix Minus – Google+.

Using USB audio mixers, Skype in VM, Virtual Sound Routing, and capturing video.

Awesome read!

–jeroen

Posted in Fusion, Power User, Skype, VMware, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

Windows 8.1 on VMware ESXi 5.1: Minimize/Maximize/Close buttons are invisible but functional

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/04/25

(Another one in the missed schedule list: this post was scheduled for this morning 06:00)

When you run a Windows 8.1 guest on VMware ESXi 5.1 with the VMware tools that belong to ESXi 5.1, the Minimize/Maximize/Close buttons are invisible but functional.

It doesn’t matter how you access that VM:

  • Through an RDP session (from either the MS RDP client on Mac OS X or MSTSC on a Windows machine).
  • Through a Console Window from vSphere Client connected to the ESXi host (if that client does not run on Windows XP).
  • Through a Console Window from VMware Workstation connected to the ESXi host.

It is good to know that this is just a visual artefact, the Minimize/Maximixe/Close buttons still work:

I was having the same exact problem with my Windows 8.1 VM.  If you click the location where the buttons should be, it still works like they are there.

But he uses a solution that is not really the kind I like:

I opened Device Manager on the VM and then uninstalled the VMware Display Adaptor, including the software for the driver.  After doing that, I scanned for hardware changes and it reinstalled the display adaptor using a windows driver.

The youngest VMware Tools version it fails with on my system is this one: 9.6.1.1378637.

Uninstalling the driver from the device manager indeed solves the issue, but:   Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in ESXi4, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, Power User, VMware, VMware ESXi, VMware Workstation | Leave a Comment »

 
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