The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for January 14th, 2020

Debugging a stackexchange memory leak while transitioning to .NET Core: by @Nick_Craver

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/14

Cool thread with steps (windbg) tooling and graphs: this is how you approach problem solving.

Easiest to read: [WayBack] Thread by @Nick_Craver: “Well hello there memory leak…let’s see what you are. It’s times when I type !dumpheap without an argument that cals. Alrighty, let’s see what these little guys are: Quite a bit of repetition in here – let’s root some of the […]”

Twitter thread below the fold.

[WayBackNick Craver on Twitter: “So let’s form our dictionary in batches EF Core will load, like this. We can lower our SQL roundtrips to n / 1000 + relevant changes. It’s more SQL trips than our original 1, but we aren’t needlessly loading a million users into memory. We load about 0.3% of that instead.… https://t.co/wgHpWgCoJH”

Tooling:

Related: Some notes/links on Windows Debugging CLR applications

A good WinDbg introduction is [WayBack] Getting Started with WinDbg (User-Mode) | Microsoft Docs.

Note that temp tables in SQL Server might look nice, but actually do not scale well: [WayBack] Lucas Trzesniewski on Twitter: “I’ve found out the following massively improves performance over queries with an IN clause with lots of parameters: – Open a transaction – Create a temp table – Bulk insert your IDs into the temp table – Inner join your query on the temp table And you only make a single query.… https://t.co/anwGSrxRqh”

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in .NET, .NET Core, .NET Core, .NET Standard, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Delphi Datasnap: How to know the name of the methods called by client in delphi datasnap server?

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/14

A great tip from [WayBack] Hi, need help regarding Datasnap. How to know the name of the methods called by client in delphi datasnap server? – sujansiddhi – Google+ that I needed a few months ago:

Walter Prins:

Inside TDSAuthenticationManager.OnUserAuthorize, inspect the EventObject.MethodAlias property. (Obviously once the method is actually called you implicitly know the methodname.)

This was introduced in Delphi XE:

–jeroen

Posted in Delphi, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

I’m harvesting credit card numbers and passwords from your site. Here’s how.

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/14

Below is one of the reasons I try to stay on the back-end side of things. Those are complex enough to focus on for me.

[WayBackI’m harvesting credit card numbers and passwords from your site. Here’s how.

It basically comes down to:

  • anything in the same page has access to anything happening on that page.
  • be careful when using npm and ad networks.
  • perform security operations in a light-weight iframe that is scrutinized.

The source of any npm package might be different from the source you find in a the underlying repository. This recursively holds for all the other npmit pulls in.

–jeroen

via: [WayBackJeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+

Posted in Development, Power User, Security, Software Development, Web Development | Leave a Comment »

 
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