The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for January 6th, 2020

samsung “software update” “this function is not available” – Google Search

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/06

When you get this on a TV from samsung “software update” “this function is not available” – Google Search, then usually you try to update the software when it is not in “watch TV” mode, but a different mode using the network (like web browsing).

See the photos below.

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in LifeHacker, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Reminder to check out the Pascal source code for Apple’s legendary Lisa operating system

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/06

This is a reminder to check when the source code was actually released:

–jeroen

Posted in 6502, Apple, Classic Macintosh, History, Power User | Leave a Comment »

The Throttle homepage. Slow that machine down!

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/06

Cool tool if you have industrial machinery that uses DOS and needs a slowdown on modern hardware (because for instance your serial communications program is running way too fast): [WayBackThe Throttle homepage. Slow that machine down!

Via Matthijs ter Woord

Downloads:

  • Q) How does throttle work?
  • A) Throttle enables power management bits in the chipset to control CPU clock. Any chipset that conforms to the ACPI (advanced configuration and power interface) specification has a means to enable and control the throttle.
    The intended purpose of these bits is to provide a means of power savings, typically utilized in notebooks or other battery powered devices.
    When the CPU is in a throttled state, it uses less power. It just so happens that a throttled CPU creates a perfect environment to emulate the performance of an older generation CPU!
  • Q) I have a chipset that supports ACPI. Why isn’t it supported in throttle?
  • A) Probably because I don’t know about it. Because the ACPI specification can be implemented in different ways by different chipset manufacturers, it’s impossible to create one generic program that works with all ACPI compliant hardware. This creates the problem of constantly updating the internal database of known hardware. So far, the biggest problem has been finding the documentation for known ACPI compliant chipsets. Adding support for them is the easy part! You may also be using an older version of throttle. Contact me for the latest.
  • Q) Can I have more speed options than just the 8 (or 16) provided?
  • A) No. Throttle provides you with as many different CPU throttling options as the chipset allows. The ACPI spec only defines 8 different modes, each one 12.5% more throttled than the previous. VIA technologies has taken the spec 1 step further and allowed for throttling on 6.25% increments, thus doubling the amount of options available, which provides for more slowdown and a finer tunability.
    If you want to run oldskool games, get a VIA motherboard!There’s nothing I can do to change the available options, and no further options will be available unless the ACPI spec changes.

–jeroen

Posted in History, MS-DOS, Power User | Leave a Comment »

 
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