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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Classic Macintosh’ Category

“This does not compute”: Mac SE/30 repair

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/09/21

A while ago, This does not compute had a few nice videos on a Mac SE/30 and it’s repair, including the recap process of replacing the electrolytic capacitors (or condensators in some other languages), and cleaning the board (some wash it with hot water and soap, others with isopropyl-alcohol, often called rubbing alcohol).

Note the simasimac can have many causes: bad capacitors in main board are the most common, but it can also be bad memory.

White lithium grease can make the floppy work again (see also [WayBack] Lithium soap – Wikipedia and [WayBack] Grease (lubricant) – Wikipedia).

He also added some links to which I added some quotes and WayBack links:

Notes

Desolder can be tricky, especially for surface mount. This helps:

  • Add some fresh 60/40 solder to the joints with a solder gun (as modern solder is lead free, whereas past solder contained lead)
  • Carefully heat up the component and surrounding area with a heat-gun

Choosing capacitors:

Soldering: always add some fresh solder on the pads before soldering surface mount (SMD) capacitors.

–jeroen

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Posted in 68k, Apple, Classic Macintosh, Development, Hardware Development, History, Macintosh SE/30, Power User, Soldering | Leave a Comment »

Mac SE/30 recap links

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/04/30

Some links for my archive:

Via:

–jeroen

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Posted in Apple, Classic Macintosh, Macintosh SE/30, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Reminder to check out the Pascal source code for Apple’s legendary Lisa operating system

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/01/06

This is a reminder to check when the source code was actually released:

–jeroen

Posted in 6502, Apple, Classic Macintosh, History, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Inactive GUI applications: click once or twice to perform an action within the application

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/07

When an application is inactive, you have to click it at least once to activate it, but sometimes click twice to actually perform an action.

In the past, there were more applications requiring it, even User Interface or Human Interface guidelines explaining the difference.

Nowadays, most of these guidelines have become hard to find, but luckily some of them have been archived in the WayBack machine.

They all come down to this:

An action in an application can be disruptive, especially when there is no confirmation step for it.

Clicking an application over the area that invokes such a disruptive action, without the user realising it can have adverse consequences.

Some links for further reading:

 

Enabling Click-Through

An item that provides click-through is one that a user can activate with one click, even though the item is in an inactive window. (To activate an item that does not support click-through, the user must first make the containing window active and then click the item.) Although click-through can make some user tasks easier, it can also confuse users if they click items unintentionally.

Click-through is not a property of a class of controls; any control, including toolbar items, can support click-through. This also means that you can support click-through for any subset of items; you don’t have to choose between supporting click-through for all items in a window or none. Follow the guidelines in this section so that you can support click-through when it’s appropriate.

Avoid providing click-through for an item or action whose result might be dangerous or undesirable. Specifically, avoid enabling click-through for an item that:

  • Performs a potentially harmful action that users can’t cancel (for example, the Delete button in Mail)
  • Performs an action that is difficult or impossible to cancel (such as the Send button in Mail)
  • Dismisses a dialog without telling the user what action was taken (for example, the Save button in a Save dialog that overwrites an existing file and automatically dismisses the dialog)
  • Removes the user from the current context (for example, selecting a new item in a Finder column that changes the target of the Finder window)

Clicking in any one of these situations should cause the window that contains the item to be brought forward, but no other action to be taken.

In general, it’s safe to provide click-through for an item that asks the user for confirmation before executing, even if the command ultimately results in destruction of data. For example, you can provide click-through for a delete button if you also make sure to give users the opportunity to cancel or confirm the action before it proceeds.

Think twice before supporting click-through for items that don’t provide confirmation feedback. Specifically, consider how dangerous the action might be, and determine how difficult it will be for the user to undo the action after it’s performed. For example, the Mail Delete button does not provide click-through because it deletes a message without asking for confirmation, which is a potentially harmful action that can be difficult to undo. On the other hand, click-through for the New button in Mail is fine because its resulting action is not harmful and is easy to undo.

Ensure that items that don’t support click-through appear disabled when their window is inactive. The disabled appearance helps users understand that these controls are unavailable. For example, the Delete and Mark as Junk buttons in the inactive Mail window shown below don’t support click-through.

An inactive window with controls that support click-through

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, Classic Macintosh, Development, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Power User, Software Development, Usability, User Experience (ux), Windows | Leave a Comment »

Two fans were podcasting at RetroMacCast before it was cool

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/08/07

Around this time, episode 500 of RetroMacCast should be out.

It’s an “about weekly” podcast centered around classic Apple computers, mainly of the Macintosh kind but occasionally also on the Apple I, ][, //e, //c and ///, IIgs and Lisa kinds.

After all these years since they started in 2006, It’s still fun to listen to.

Occasionally they do a vodcast on YouTube, for instance their 100th show below.

New episodes are announced here:

Source: [WayBackTwo fans were podcasting at RetroMacCast before it was cool

–jeroen

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Posted in //e, Apple, Apple ][, Classic Macintosh, History, Macintosh SE/30, Power User | Leave a Comment »

 
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