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Archive for April 30th, 2021

VMware ESXi console: viewing all VMs, suspending and waking them up: part 5

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/04/30

Yesterday’s post got a bit longer than anticipated as there were most steps than I hoped for to create the listing script vim-cmd-list-all-VMs.sh:

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/29/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-4/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
done

This means that today there is a new try to cover the rest of these lists I started yesterday with:

Available commands

  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.hibernate vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.off vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.on vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.reboot vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.reset vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.shutdown vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.suspend vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.suspendResume vmid

Unavailable commands

  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.startup vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.resume vmid
  • vim-cmd vmsvc/power.wakeup vmid

So here we go:

vim-cmd-hibernate-running-VMs.sh and vim-cmd-suspend-running-VMs.sh

These files are almost the same: the echo and command are different (Hibernating versus Suspending and power.hibernate versus suspend)

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered on" ] ; then
        echo "Powered on  VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Hibernating VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.hibernate ${vmid}
    fi
done

This hibernates all VMs with power state Powered on and waits for each VM to complete hibernation.

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered on" ] ; then
        echo "Powered on VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Suspending VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.suspend ${vmid}
    fi
done

This suspends all VMs with power state Powered on and waits for each VM to complete suspending.

vim-cmd-resume-suspended-VMs.sh and vim-cmd-wakeup-suspended-VMs.sh

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Suspended" ] ; then
        echo "Suspended VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Resuming  VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.on ${vmid}
    fi
done

This resumes (as there is no vim-cmd vmsvc/power.resume vmid) all VMs with power state Suspended and waits for each VM to complete resume.

vim-cmd-power-off-powered-on-VMs.sh

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered on" ] ; then
        echo "Powered on   VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Powering off VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.off ${vmid}
    fi
done

This powers off all VMs with power state Power on and waits for each VM to start powering off (but does not wait for them to complete powering off, so parts run in parallel).

vim-cmd-power-on-powered-off-VMs.shvim-cmd-power-on-shutdown-VMs.sh and vim-cmd-startup-shutdown-VMs.sh

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered off" ] ; then
        echo "Powered off VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Powering on VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.on ${vmid}
    fi
done

These powers on all VMs with power state Powered off and waits for each VM to complete power on (but does not wait for them to complete boot, so part runs in parallel!).

These are exactly the same, as you cannot distinguish a VM that has been shutdown by vim-cmd vmsvc/power.off vmid from vim-cmd vmsvc/shutdown vmid.

vim-cmd-reboot-powered-on-VMs.sh

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered on" ] ; then
        echo "Powered on VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Rebooting  VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.reboot ${vmid}
    fi
done

This reboots all VMs with power state Power on and waits for each VM to start rebooting (but does not wait for them to complete reboot, so parts run in parallel).

vim-cmd-reset-powered-on-VMs.sh

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered on" ] ; then
        echo "Powered on VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "Resetting  VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.reset ${vmid}
    fi
done

This resets all VMs with power state Power on and waits for each VM to start rebooting (but does not wait for them to complete reboot, so parts run in parallel).

vim-cmd-suspendResume-powered-on-VMs.sh

#!/bin/sh
# https://wiert.me/2021/04/30/vmware-esxi-console-viewing-all-vms-suspending-and-waking-them-up-part-5/
vmids=`vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | sed -n -E -e "s/^([[:digit:]]+)\s+((\S.+\S)?)\s+(\[\S+\])\s+(.+\.vmx)\s+(\S+)\s+(vmx-[[:digit:]]+)\s*?((\S.+)?)$/\1/p"`
for vmid in ${vmids} ; do
    powerState=`vim-cmd vmsvc/power.getstate ${vmid} | sed '1d'`
    name=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/\(vim.vm.ConfigInfo\) \{/,/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/ s/^ +name = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    vmPathName=`vim-cmd vmsvc/get.config ${vmid} | sed -n -E -e '/files = \(vim.vm.FileInfo\) \{/,/tools = \(vim.vm.ToolsConfigInfo\) \{/ s/^ +vmPathName = "(.*)",.*?/\1/p'`
    # echo "VM with id ${vmid} has power state ${powerState} (name = ${name}; vmPathName = ${vmPathName})."
    if [ "${powerState}" == "Powered on" ] ; then
        echo "Powered on      VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        echo "SuspendResuming VM with id ${vmid} and name: $name"
        vim-cmd vmsvc/power.suspendResume ${vmid}
    fi
done

This suspends and resumes on all VMs with power state Power on and waits for each VM to start this shirt cycle (but does not wait for them to complete the suspend and resume cycle, so parts run in parallel).

Future episodes

For now, this is OK enough for me, but I might write a new installment trying to run more of these in parallel (as parts already are done on the ESXi side).

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, ash/dash, ash/dash development, Development, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, ESXi6.7, ESXi7, Power User, Scripting, sed, sed script, Software Development, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

Mac SE/30 recap links

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/04/30

Some links for my archive:

Via:

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Apple, Classic Macintosh, Macintosh SE/30, Power User | Leave a Comment »

AstraZeneca: tweede prik gaat gewoon door (via Rijksoverheid.nl)

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/04/30

 

Posted in About, LifeHacker, Personal, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Celebrate Email Debt Forgiveness Day!

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/04/30

If there’s an email response you’ve wanted to send but been too anxious to send, you can send it today

[Wayback] Celebrate Email Debt Forgiveness Day! | Email Debt Forgiveness Day

Via: [Archive.is] Ionica Smeets on Twitter: “Voor wie net als ik nog wat achterstallige mails heeft: komende vrijdag is het email debt forgiveness day”

–jeroen


Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in LifeHacker, Power User | Leave a Comment »

Thoughts on ix500; should I get an ix1500?

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/04/30

Some of my thoughts on [WayBack] AW: Netzwerkfähiger Dokumentenscanner?:

I use a Fujitsu ScanSnap ix500 scanner for this plus a Windows VM that automatically logs on.

It is out of production now, but I think most of the below holds as the successor ix1500 is very similar (ix500 announcement https://www.fujitsu.com/sg/about/res…-20181002.html)

Before the ix500, I used a Fujitsu ScanSnap S510 which had similar capabilities as the ix500 but was a lot slower.

Cool things:

  • included software can do OCR and scan to a path the Windows user has access to
  • the scanner is fast, and does a stack of A4 full duplex automatically at a few seconds per page scanning on the scanner and 5-10 seconds per page OCR on a 1.2 Ghz dual core VM
  • no fiddling from within the scanner to get network stuff working, or to keep it up-to-date on protocol changes

Drawbacks:

  • the software pops up a dialog after each scan, so I wrote this: https://bitbucket.org/jeroenp/wiert….onsoleProject/
  • you need a Windows PC that is logged on (so the software does work), which means I configured a VM to auto-logon
  • WiFi 2.4 Ghz only (no ethernet interface, no 5 Ghz WiFi)
  • you need USB on the same VM connected to the scanner once to configure WiFI
  • like any hardware/software combination, sometimes the scanner or Windows VM need a reboot, for instance when it looses network or USB connection

The ix1500 has a touch screen instead of 2 buttons, so it might be that it has more standalone functionalities than the ix500.

Since I need a second scanner in a second place, I might get an ix1500 after the summer.

–jeroen

–jeroen

Posted in Fujitsu ScanSnap, Hardware, ix500, LifeHacker, Power User, Scanners | Leave a Comment »

 
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