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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Shift JIS’ Category

Long read about Unicode: You, Me And The Emoji: Character Sets, Encoding And Emoji – Smashing Magazine

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/11/07

A well worth long rad:

We all recognize emoji. They’ve become the global pop stars of digital communication. But what are they, technically speaking? And what might we learn by taking a closer look at these images, characters, pictographs… whatever they are 🤔 (Thinking Face). We will dig deep to learn about how these thingamajigs work. Please note: Depending on your browser, you may not be able to see all emoji featured in this article (especially the Tifinagh characters). Also, different platforms vary in how they display emoji as well. That’s why the article always provides textual alternatives. Don’t let it discourage you from reading though! Now, let’s start with a seemingly simple question. What are emoji?

[WayBackYou, Me And The Emoji: Character Sets, Encoding And Emoji – Smashing Magazine

Via: [WayBack] Everything you ever wanted to know about characters, encodings, glyphs… and, oh yeah, emoji: bit.ly/2fNKeW3Long, rewarding read. – Ilya Grigorik – Google+

Here is just the ToC:

TABLE OF CONTENTS LINK

  1. Character Sets And Document Encoding: An Overview
    1. Characters
    2. Character Sets
    3. Coded Character Sets
    4. Encoding
  2. Declaring Character Sets And Document Encoding On The Web
    1. content-type HTTP Header Declaration
    2. Checking HTTP Headers Using A Browser’s Developer Tools
    3. Checking HTTP Headers Using Web-based Tools
    4. Using A Meta Element With charset Attribute
    5. An Encoding By Any Other Name
  3. What Were We Talking About Again? Oh Yeah, Emoji!
    1. So What Are Emoji?
    2. How Do We Use Emoji?
    3. Character References
    4. Glyphs
    5. How Do We Know If We Have These Symbols?
    6. The Great Emoji Proliferation Of 2016
  4. Emoji OS Support
    1. Emoji Support: Apple Platforms (macOS and iOS)
    2. Emoji Support: Windows
    3. Emoji Support: Linux
    4. Emoji Support: Android
  5. Emoji On The Web
    1. Emoji One
    2. Twemoji
  6. Conclusion

–jeroen

Posted in ASCII, Development, Encoding, ISO-8859, ISO8859, Shift JIS, Unicode, UTF-16, UTF-8, UTF16, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

Some interesting encoding/Unicode/text articles on kunststube and links for test files of various encodings

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/08/17

After yesterdays post on Testing and static methods don’t go well together, I read around on Source (kunststube [WayBack]) a bit more and found these very nice articles on encoding,Unicode and text:

Related on those, some other nice readings:

–jeroen

Posted in Ansi, ASCII, CP437/OEM 437/PC-8, Development, EBCDIC, Encoding, ISO-8859, ISO8859, Shift JIS, Software Development, Unicode, UTF-16, UTF-8, UTF16, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

Recommended reads when dealing with Character Encodings in software

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/05/06

Apart from the mandatory Joel on Software article about Unicode and Character sets, these two articles are of great value too:

Fun to read from that blog is the Historical Technology  section including this article:

–jeroen

PS: The mandatory one is The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!) – Joel on Software.

 

Posted in .NET, Ansi, ASCII, CP437/OEM 437/PC-8, Delphi, Development, EBCDIC, Encoding, ISO-8859, ISO8859, Shift JIS, Software Development, Unicode, UTF-8, UTF8, Windows-1252 | Leave a Comment »

Delphi “type types”: similar types but not the same type identity, some examples.

Posted by jpluimers on 2013/03/12

Few people know about a Delphi language feature that has been present since Delphi 1: prepending the type definition with a type keyword to make the type getting a new identity.

Each time I use it, I have to do some browsing for the consequences, and this time I wrote down some notes and created a small example program (source is also below).

This time I needed it when writing class wrappers on top of the Delphi bindings for WebSphere MQ.

WebSphere MQ has Queues where you can put and get messages. It also has Queue Managers to which you connect, and that provide queuing services and manages queues.

Both Queues and Queue Managers have names that can be up to 48 (single byte) characters long.
Those names mean totally different things, so though the have similar data types, they have a different identity.

The same holds for 20 byte character arrays (they can be used as names for ChannelNameShortConnectionName and MCAName). The 264 byte character array is so far used for ConnectionName only.

Distinguishing those types: That’s what “type types” in Delphi are all about. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in CP437/OEM 437/PC-8, Delphi, Delphi 1, Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 3, Delphi 4, Delphi 5, Delphi 6, Delphi 7, Delphi 8, Delphi x64, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Development, Encoding, Shift JIS, Software Development, Unicode, UTF-8, UTF8 | 1 Comment »

 
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