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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger’ Category

ssh from Mac OS X to ESXi: “WARNING: terminal is not fully functional”

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/03/29

When connecting from my Mac to my ESXi rig, some commands (especially less) show this output:

WARNING: terminal is not fully functional

So I created this alias to connect from my Mac to the internal address of my ESXi rig:

alias ssh-esxi-X10SRH-CF-internal='TERM=xterm ssh -p 22 root@192.168.71.91'

The trick is the bold part: TERM=xterm (which you can also replace by export TERM=xterm; if you want future ssh sessions to use the same [wayback] TERM setting).

The reason is that the Mac defines the TERM variable as containing xterm-256 which is defined on the Mac itself, but ESXi has a hard time coping with it.

Some Mac OS and Xcode combinations had a problem with xterm-256 not being present ([WayBackmacos – Terminal strangeness after installing Xcode on Lion – Super User), but this isn’t the case on my system:

$ ls -alh `find /usr/share/terminfo | grep 'xterm-256color'`
-rw-r--r-- 1 root wheel 3.2K Jul 30 2016 /usr/share/terminfo/78/xterm-256color

On the Mac you really want to use xterm-256color as it looks way better than xterm-color or xterm: [WayBacklinux – What is the difference between xterm-color & xterm-256color? – Stack Overflow (thanks [WayBack] Chris Page!)

It seems I already did something similar on ESXi itself to get esxtop working: ESXi: when esxtop shows garbage. That was on the ESXi side and works as well for this problem too.

However, it is a bit harder to have a script run during ESXi boot time that sets this, so it is easier to fix this on the Mac side.

It works for all OS X and ESXi versions I’ve tested so far.

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, Apple, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, iMac, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, MacMini, macOS 10.12 Sierra, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

TigerVNC on Mac OS X with homebrew to check why a Screen Sharing.app connection fails.

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/01/18

Two installation options for TigerVNC:

The [WayBackTigerVNC  viewer gives a bit more details on failing VNC connections than the stock OSX Screen Sharing.app does: after performing the logon, the connection would just stall, but TigerVNC would should  “write broken pipe (32)” after the logon. Most of the linked search results indicated the VNC server was having a state problem.

So I restarted the VNC server, after which connections could be made again in both tools.

I actually prefer the stock Screen Sharing.app as:

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, macOS 10.12 Sierra, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Power User, VNC | Leave a Comment »

Restoring files from OS X Time Machine with Terminal.app

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/12/01

cd /Volumes/Backup/Backups.backupdb/Joshua\ Priddle’s\ MacBook\ Pro/Latest/Macintosh\ HD/Users/priddle

tmutil restore -v secret_docs.txt ~/

Learned from [WayBackRestoring files from OS X Time Machine with Terminal.app:

  • do not use cp as it will give you wrong permissions
  • do use tmutil

More elaborate steps (including finding the backup in the first place) is at [WayBackCommandline restoration of a file in Time Machine on OS X | Hacks for Macs

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, iMac, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, MacMini, macOS 10.12 Sierra, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Power User | Leave a Comment »

OS X – the versions and their names – as I always forget them

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/04/03

I always forget which OS X versions there are and which names they use.

So via: OS X – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, I made this list where the first item points to the table in the above article and each subsequent item to the individual article on the version. I tried to find EOL dates, but that’s hard despite the overview at Apple security updates – Apple Support:

None of this would be noteworthy if Apple, like Microsoft and a host of other major software vendors, clearly spelled out its support policies. But Apple doesn’t, leaving users to guess about when their operating systems will fall off support. | Computerworld

–jeroen

PS: EOL dates are as of 20160403.

Posted in Apple, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Power User | 1 Comment »

Determining the current shell in *n*x variants including ESXi

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/02/08

On most systems, I use bash as shell, but not all systems have it, for instance the shell.xs4all.nl server uses tcsh and ESXi 4+ uses a very limited ash shell from busybox (ESX 4 had bash though).

There is this huge script that covers many shell and operating system versions (even DOS, Windows) and interpreters (python, ruby, php, etc) what shell is this which I got through Stéphane Chazelas‘s answer in linux – determine shell in script during runtime – Unix & Linux Stack Exchange

I wanted a shorter thing that works in current Linux, BSD, OS X and ESXi versions.

Some very short scripts are less reliable, for instance echo $SHELL looks nice, but isn’t always set.

Similar for echo $0 which will fail for instance if it shows as sh but in fact is a different shell in disguise.

This works for bash, tcsh and busybox sh, is a bit more precise than getting $0. It’s based on HOWTO: Detect bash from shell script – Stack Overflow:

lsof -p $$ | awk '(NR==2) {print $1}'

But on ESXi it shows this because lsof doesn’t take any parameter there and just dumps all information:

----------+---------------------+---------------------+--------+------------------

It’s because lsof on ESXi always shows this header where Cartel and World aren’t exactly well documented:

Cartel | World name | Type | fd | Description
----------+---------------------+---------------------+--------+------------------

Empirically for non VM related processes, it looks like the Cartel is the PID and World name the command.

On Linux and BSD based systems, the header looks like this, so command and PID are reversed in ESXi:

COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME

This command then works on both ESXi, OS X, Linux and BSD assuming you can word search for the PID and noting that PID/command will be reversed on ESXi as compared to OSX/Linux/BSD:

lsof -p $$ | grep -w $$ | awk '(NR==2) {print $1,$2}'

–jeroen

Posted in Apple, bash, BSD, Development, iMac, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, MacMini, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Power User, Scripting, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

 
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