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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Delphi 1’ Category

Happy Birthday AppBuilder^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Delphi

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/02/14

Normal people would give Valentine presents today.

But 20 years ago, Borland thought it was a nice idea to release Delphi. Then a revolutionary new tool and lots of scepticism. Now – after 20 years – still going strong, despite all kinds of funny things that management at Borland, InPrise, etc did and the wild ride the market had.

Happy birthday Delphi!

–jeroen

Posted in Delphi, Delphi 1, Delphi 2, Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 3, Delphi 4, Delphi 5, Delphi 6, Delphi 7, Delphi 8, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Delphi XE8, Development, Software Development | 2 Comments »

My wish for Delphi: Please bring multi-level undo/redo functionality in the Delphi designer (form, datamodule, etc).

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/02/13

After a hectic week bringing back memories from a long time ago, I remembered the really early Delphi days.

Long before [WayBack] QC2747, back when it was still called AppBuilder, several people – including me – made the wish for an undo/redo functionality on the Delphi compuserve board.

Back then, the argument was that the designer needed to be restructured to do that. Now that it has – to accommodate FMX – and it is time, especially for the vast majority of Delphi users primarily using the designers to get work done.

So my wish, after 20+ years of Delphi use:

Please bring multi-level undo/redo functionality in the Delphi designer (form, datamodule, etc).

–jeroen

Posted in Delphi, Delphi 1, Delphi 2, Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 3, Delphi 4, Delphi 5, Delphi 6, Delphi 7, Delphi 8, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Delphi XE8, Development, QC, Software Development | 2 Comments »

Blast from the Past: `TThread` got introduced in Delphi 2

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/01/03

Thanks Nick Hodges for asking, and Uwe Raabe for answering:

Yep! Delphi 2 had TThread while Delphi 1 did not.

It resulted in an interesting thread including topics like cooperative multi-tasking and named pipes under DOS by using Turbo Pascal.

Boy, I remember the \pipe\ days and releasing a time slice by calling INT $28, $15 and $2F combinations like this:

asm
int $28
mov ax, $1000
int $15 { DESQview/TopView give up time slice }
mov ax, $1680
int $2F
end;

Note: you can even use INT $2F with AX=$1680 to check if you are running in a DOS x86 VM and other OS checks.

–jeroen

via: Anyone remember which version of Delphi introduced TThread?.

Posted in Borland Pascal, Delphi, Delphi 1, Delphi 2, Development, Pascal, Software Development, Turbo Pascal | 4 Comments »

Which Delphi extensions to (not) put in version control: Delphi File Extensions – Delphi Programming (via Delphi.wikia.com)

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/12/10

Convenient list to decide what to put in your version control system: Delphi File Extensions – Delphi Programming.

–jeroen

Posted in Delphi, Delphi 1, Delphi 2, Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 3, Delphi 4, Delphi 5, Delphi 6, Delphi 7, Delphi 8, Delphi x64, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Delphi: removing “unused” units from uses lists cannot be fully automated (via: SO)

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/11/11

One of the things a lot of Delphi users want is to be able to automagically remove unused units from their uses lists and projects.

The short answer is: you can’t.

The long answer starts with: you can’t fore a number of reasons.

Similar reasonings hold for many other development environments. Plain Windows EXEs and DLL dependencies. .NET projects and assembly dependencies, etc.

Initialization/Finalization dependency

The first reason is that each unit (module, assembly, or other dependency) can contain global code to be executed at unit start/load or finish/unload.

So even though you do not reference anything inside that unit, the initialization and finalization sections can be run.

Removing the dependency from your units and project, kills that functionality. And might break all sorts of things.

Load order dependency

Sometimes you have subtle load order dependencies of units. Those should be rare, and if they are there, should be enforced by the affected units themselves. But everyone knows those subtle dependencies are more often a by product not enforced by anything than coincidence.

So if you start removing references, the load order might change, and subtle bugs may occur.

In other words: test, test, test and test your codebase before and after removing unit references from uses lists.

Parsing

If you understands the dependencies of initializtion/finalization or load order, you will get interested to know what units are actually being used.

The ultimate source for this would be the Delphi compiler. Bad luck here: you cannot use it as the IDE and command-line interfaces don’t offer a hook to it to do just this.

So you need alternative parsers that can help out. The answers to How to remove unused units from all source files on Delphi XE2 describe a few and they all have the same drawback: they are not the Delphi compiler, so they are a rough approximation of what the compiler would do.

And even if the approximation would be perfect, they all suffer from the same thing the compiler suffers from: you can only have one set of conditional defines, platforms, etc at the same time.

There is lots of code for which the usage is conditional, but where the uses list does not reflect this.

Fazit

Optimizing uses lists to eliminate unused units seems a simple thing at start, but isn’t.

The best way to keep those optimized is to prune them while developing. So if you remove code, try to remember cutting down the uses lists by hand.

And then test, test, test and test your codebase.

–jeroen

via: ide – How to remove unused units from all source files on Delphi XE2? – Stack Overflow.

Posted in Delphi, Delphi 1, Delphi 2, Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 3, Delphi 4, Delphi 5, Delphi 6, Delphi 7, Delphi 8, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Development, Software Development | 8 Comments »

 
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