The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Visual Studio 2003’ Category

[CMake] choose 32bit or 64bit in visual studio

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/05/03

This might be obvious for CMake regulars, but given the help, I would never have guessed this.

Generate x64:

cmake .. -G"Visual Studio 14 Win64"

Generate x86 is just leaving out the platform away:

cmake .. -G"Visual Studio 14"

In this case they are for Visual Studio 2015 (internally named 14).

The help:

The following generators are available on this platform:
  Visual Studio 14 2015 [arch] = Generates Visual Studio 2015 project files.
                                 Optional [arch] can be "Win64" or "ARM".
  Visual Studio 12 2013 [arch] = Generates Visual Studio 2013 project files.
                                 Optional [arch] can be "Win64" or "ARM".
  Visual Studio 11 2012 [arch] = Generates Visual Studio 2012 project files.
                                 Optional [arch] can be "Win64" or "ARM".
  Visual Studio 10 2010 [arch] = Generates Visual Studio 2010 project files.
                                 Optional [arch] can be "Win64" or "IA64".
  Visual Studio 9 2008 [arch]  = Generates Visual Studio 2008 project files.
                                 Optional [arch] can be "Win64" or "IA64".
  Visual Studio 8 2005 [arch]  = Generates Visual Studio 2005 project files.
                                 Optional [arch] can be "Win64".
  Visual Studio 7 .NET 2003    = Deprecated.  Generates Visual Studio .NET
                                 2003 project files.

–jeroen

Adopted from: [CMake] choose 32bit or 64bit in visual studio

Posted in .NET, Development, Software Development, Visual Studio 11, Visual Studio 2002, Visual Studio 2003, Visual Studio 2005, Visual Studio 2008, Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2014, Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio and tools | Leave a Comment »

csc.exe: prevent “does not contain a static ‘Main’ method suitable for an entry point”, use /target:library

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/06/29

Every once in a while I do Command-line Building With csc.exe.

When building libraries, it throws this error:

The reason is that by default it wants to build a program.

Change this default by adding the /target:library parameter.

–jeroen

via: c# – Program does not contain a static ‘Main’ method suitable for an entry point – Stack Overflow.

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, Development, Software Development, Visual Studio 11, Visual Studio 2002, Visual Studio 2003, Visual Studio 2005, Visual Studio 2008, Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2014, Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio and tools | Leave a Comment »

Batch file to run the most recent vsvars32.bat

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/06/28

The below batch file finds and runs the latest vsvars32.bat on a system.

vsvars32.bat initializes the path and other environment variables to run Visual Studio and command-line tools (like csc.exe, xsd.exe, editbin.exe).

The batch file employs a few tricks from:

  :: Run the most recent vsvars32.bat

  :: test these environment variables that have 110 or 120 in them (future enhancements: support more Visual Studio versions):
  :: Visual Studio .NET 2002: VS70COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET\Common7\Tools\
  :: Visual Studio .NET 2003: VS71COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2003\Common7\Tools\
  :: Visual Studio 2005: VS80COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 8\Common7\Tools\
  :: Visual Studio 2008: VS90COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\Tools\
  :: Visual Studio 2010: VS100COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\Tools\
  :: Visual Studio 2012: VS110COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\Tools\
  :: Visual Studio 2013: VS120COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\Tools\
  :: VS130COMNTOOLS was skipped: http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1215607-visual-studio-13-to-be-skipped-vnext-to-be-v14/
  :: Visual Studio 2015: VS130COMNTOOLS=C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Common7\Tools\
  :: They contain `vsvars32.bat` which will update the `PATH` so it includes where `xsd.exe`, `csc.exe`, `editbin.exe` and others reside
  :: Different examples: https://github.com/noop-dev/c-cgdk/blob/master/compile-vscpp.bat
  :: and https://code.google.com/p/xvid4psp/source/browse/trunk/bin/4Gb+patcher.bat
  :: or give it a go for any version: http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/ptexternal/src/ptII/ptolemy/actor/lib/fmi/fmus/template/sources/build_fmu.bat
  setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
  :: delayed expansion allows for the exclamation marks
  :: see http://ss64.com/nt/delayedexpansion.html
  :: see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/22857407/windows-batch-how-to-assign-variable-with-dynamic-name
  for %%v in (70 71 80 90 100 110 120 130) do if not [!VS%%vCOMNTOOLS!]==[] set VSCOMNTOOLS=!VS%%vCOMNTOOLS!
  :: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/28682268/assign-variables-past-endlocal-in-a-loop
  endlocal & call :do call "%VSCOMNTOOLS%vsvars32.bat"
  goto :eof

:do
  echo %*
  %*
  goto :eof

–jeroen

via: Finding the path of xsd.exe from your Visual Studio Build Events « The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff.

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, Development, Software Development, Visual Studio 11, Visual Studio 2002, Visual Studio 2003, Visual Studio 2005, Visual Studio 2008, Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2014, Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio and tools | Leave a Comment »

Finding the path of xsd.exe from your Visual Studio Build Events

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/05/05

I wrote about the xsd.exe tool before to generate XSD from XML:

But it is much more than that, as it is a great way of generating .NET (not only C# and VB.NET code) from XSD files:

Long ago, xsd.exe used to come as part of Visual Studio, but now it is installed with the various Microsoft Windows SDK versions (of which some are downloadable) which makes it harder to locate on your system.

The really bad thing is that Visual Studio cannot find XSD.exe as part of your project Build Events, as the PATH has not been set up correctly.

Starting xsd.exe from a Visual Studio Build Events

In my hunt for the xsd.exe location, I started with a small batch file to find the xsd.exe locations from the registry:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in .NET, Continuous Integration, Development, msbuild, Software Development, Visual Studio 2003, Visual Studio 2005, Visual Studio 2008, Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2014, Visual Studio and tools, XML/XSD, XSD | 3 Comments »

Macros are gone since Visual Studio 2012, but an extension brings textual macro’s back (via Can I record/play Macros in Visual Studio 2012/2013? – Stack Overflow)

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/02/25

This is why I like the extensions in Visual Studio so much: even though recordable macro’s were removed in Visual Studio 11, textual macros (which I used most) are in the Text Macros for Visual Studio 2012/2013 extension by Xavier Poinas:

You can try this extension (I am the author):

http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/8e2103b6-87cf-4fef-9410-a580c434b602

It basically does the same thing as the Notepad++ macros (text editing, no UI automation).

The code is open source (GitHub), so feel free to contribute improvements :-)

–jeroen

via: Can I record/play Macros in Visual Studio 2012/2013? – Stack Overflow.

Posted in .NET, Development, Software Development, Visual Studio 11, Visual Studio 2002, Visual Studio 2003, Visual Studio 2005, Visual Studio 2008, Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio and tools | 4 Comments »

 
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