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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘VB.NET 11.0’ Category

Difference Between Int32.Parse, Convert.ToInt32, and Int32.TryParse – CodeProject

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/08/05

Every C#/VB/.NET developer should read Difference Between Int32.Parse, Convert.ToInt32, and Int32.TryParse – CodeProject.

Then also read TryParse with default values.

It is all about handling values that are not Integers, Overflow values and Nulls. There are subtle differences, in the handling of the methods, and the exceptions they could throw: ArgumentNullException, FormatException and OverflowException.

Finally read all about the NumberStyles enumeration, IFormatProvider interface and CultureInfo (especially the difference between InvariantCulture, CurrentCulture, CurrentUICulture and InstalledUICulture).

Because getting your conversions right matters.

–jeroen

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, C#, C# 1.0, C# 2.0, C# 3.0, C# 4.0, C# 5.0, C# 6 (Roslyn), Development, Mono, Mono for Android, Prism, RemObjects C#, Software Development, VB.NET, VB.NET 10.0, VB.NET 11.0, VB.NET 7.0, VB.NET 7.1, VB.NET 8.0, VB.NET 9.0 | Leave a Comment »

Inversion of Control via constructor argument passing

Posted by jpluimers on 2015/06/18

Inversion of Control example video on YouTube: business class is not in control of the DAL.

It uses C#, but the code is so simple that every programmer should be able to get it.

Uses:

  • interfaces
  • parameter passing through constructor
  • moving control decisions out of the business class

Inversion of Control (IoC) can later be amended by Dependency Injection (DI), but IoC can easily without that be used very effectively without DI.

I wish the What is…? series had more than 1 episode, but Christian Richards does have some interesting series about game development.

–jeroen

via: duidelijk voorbeeld.

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, C#, C# 1.0, C# 2.0, C# 3.0, C# 4.0, C# 5.0, C# 6 (Roslyn), Development, RemObjects C#, Software Development, VB.NET, VB.NET 10.0, VB.NET 11.0, VB.NET 7.0, VB.NET 7.1, VB.NET 8.0, VB.NET 9.0 | Leave a Comment »

.NET/C#: Chaning the ForeColor of a ReadOnly/Disabled TextBox (via: Stack Overflow)

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/12/24

Once every while you still do WinForms work, and bump into something you hadn’t bumped into before.

This time it was trying to set ForeColor = Color.Red on a ReadOnly TextBox for displaying error messages:

  • Using a TextBox means the user can still copy the text to the clipboard.
  • Using a Red foreground draws enough attention (it’s was an app with a really busy user interface).

When setting a TextBox from ReadOnly = false to true sets the BackColor from SystemColors.Window (usually white) to SystemColors.Control (usually light grey), and leaves the ForeColor to SystemColors.WindowText (usually black).

Setting ForeColor = Color.Red (funny there is a plural in SystemColors but not in Color) it doesn’t display it as such:

To my surprise, the TextBox had ReadOnly text (you could copy, but not modify it), which showed with a a grey (SystemColors.Control) BackColor and a black (SystemColors.WindowText) ForeColor: the defaults for a ReadOnly TextBox, not using my ForeColor = Color.Red;

I vaguely remembered there was some odd way of solving this, but since I hadn’t written a blog article about it back then (somewhere around .NET 1.x or 2.0 I didn’t have a blog yet), I was glad that Cheetah posted this answer on StackOverflow: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, C#, C# 1.0, C# 2.0, C# 3.0, C# 4.0, C# 5.0, Development, Software Development, VB.NET, VB.NET 10.0, VB.NET 11.0, VB.NET 7.0, VB.NET 7.1, VB.NET 8.0, VB.NET 9.0, Visual Studio 11, Visual Studio 2002, Visual Studio 2003, Visual Studio 2005, Visual Studio 2008, Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio and tools, WinForms | Leave a Comment »

.NET: case insensitive string replace without using RegEx (via: Stack Overflow)

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/12/16

Two ways to do a case insensitive string replace without using RegEx (which often is not a solution).

Thanks User Tim Schmelter for pointing me at those.

–jeroen

via: Is there a case insensitive string replace in .Net without using Regex? – Stack Overflow.

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, C#, C# 1.0, C# 2.0, C# 3.0, C# 4.0, C# 5.0, Development, Software Development, VB.NET, VB.NET 10.0, VB.NET 11.0, VB.NET 7.0, VB.NET 7.1, VB.NET 8.0, VB.NET 9.0 | 2 Comments »

Delphi, C#, VB.NET and SQL all have escapes to use reserved words as identifiers

Posted by jpluimers on 2014/11/04

Normally you would not want to use a reserved word as an identifier. But sometimes it can be very convenient, for instance for a code generator that wraps remoting calls or does ORM.

Both Delphi and C# have an escape for this:

The prefixes are to tell the compiler knows you really know what you are doing, and are using a reserved word as an identifier.

The cool thing: in the Run Time Type Information (Delphi) or Reflection (C# and VB.NET) you will see the names without the prefix.

Some examples from StackOverflow: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in .NET, .NET 1.x, .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0, .NET 3.5, .NET 4.0, .NET 4.5, C#, C# 1.0, C# 2.0, C# 3.0, C# 4.0, C# 5.0, Delphi, Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 8, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Development, Software Development, VB.NET, VB.NET 10.0, VB.NET 11.0, VB.NET 7.0, VB.NET 7.1, VB.NET 8.0, VB.NET 9.0 | Leave a Comment »

 
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