The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘VMware ESXi’ Category

esxi listing usb devices on host console: lsusb

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/07/10

Searching for esxi list usb devices on host console did not return meaningful results, but after a few more deeper tries I found that ESXi has lsusb at

Here the difference when connecting another USB hub with devices to an existing ESXi machine:

[root@ESXi-X10SRH-CF:~] lsusb
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 0781:5583 SanDisk Corp. Ultra Fit
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 0557:2419 ATEN International Co., Ltd 
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0557:7000 ATEN International Co., Ltd Hub
Bus 003 Device 002: ID 8087:8002 Intel Corp. 
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:800a Intel Corp. 
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 0557:2221 ATEN International Co., Ltd Winbond Hermon
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 0e0f:8002 VMware, Inc. 
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 0e0f:8002 VMware, Inc. 
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 0e0f:8003 VMware, Inc. 
[root@ESXi-X10SRH-CF:~] lsusb
Bus 001 Device 010: ID 0409:005a NEC Corp. HighSpeed Hub
Bus 001 Device 009: ID 0922:0019 Dymo-CoStar Corp. LabelWriter 400
Bus 001 Device 008: ID 06bc:0324 Oki Data Corp. 
Bus 001 Device 007: ID 0409:005a NEC Corp. HighSpeed Hub
Bus 001 Device 006: ID 1a40:0101 Terminus Technology Inc. Hub
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 0781:5583 SanDisk Corp. Ultra Fit
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 0557:2419 ATEN International Co., Ltd 
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0557:7000 ATEN International Co., Ltd Hub
Bus 003 Device 002: ID 8087:8002 Intel Corp. 
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:800a Intel Corp. 
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 0557:2221 ATEN International Co., Ltd Winbond Hermon
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 0e0f:8002 VMware, Inc. 
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 0e0f:8002 VMware, Inc. 
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 0e0f:8003 VMware, Inc.

A few odd things about the devices listed above:

  1. are in none of the /var/log/* files when searching for Oki, Dymo or NEC
  2. are listed differently in Windows:
    • Windows lists the 06bc:0324 Oki Data Corp.  as a “Composite device” with a few sub-devices “MC5(3)x2/ES5(3)4×2” and “USB Printing Support”
    • Windows lists the 0922:0019 Dymo-CoStar Corp. LabelWriter 400 as “USB Printing Support” with a subdevice “DYMO LabelWriter 400”
  3. are listed differently when assigning them to a VM:

Two indispensable tools on Windows for dealing with USB devices are:

They give a much easier to read view than devmgmt.msc, this despite the “hidden devices” trick at [WayBack] Tweak Device Manager for a more Complete View of Devices

Related:

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

Determining the ESXi installation type (2014558) | VMware KB

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/05/31

Via [WayBackDetermining the ESXi installation type (2014558) | VMware KB

# esxcfg-info -e
boot type: visor-usb

That’s on my X10SRH-CF system which runs from USB.

Values you can get:

  • visor-pxe indicates a PXE deployment
  • visor-thin indicates an installable deployment
  • visor-usb indicates an embedded deployment

If your installation is visor-thin based (running from hard-disk), then you can convert it to visor-usb; the steps are at [WayBackvisor-thin & vsantraces – Hypervisor.fr (in French, but Google Translate is quite OK). It skips a few of the steps mentioned in [WayBack] How To Backup & Restore Free ESXi Host Configuration | virtuallyGhetto, so for saving your current config it’s best to follow these steps:

  1. Shutdown or suspend all VMs
  2. vim-cmd hostsvc/firmware/sync_config
  3. vim-cmd hostsvc/firmware/backup_config
  4. Copy the generated backup from /scratch/downloads (a UUID directory under it)to a safe location
  5. vim-cmd hostsvc/maintenance_mode_enter
  6. shutdown
  7. Install the same ESXi version on a USB disk
  8. Boot from the USB disk
  9. copy the backup to /tmp/configBundle.tgz
  10. vim-cmd hostsvc/firmware/restore_config /tmp/configBundle.tgz
  11. reboot

–jeroen

via [WayBackHow to tell if ESXi is installed to SD card or local HDD? : vmware

Posted in ESXi6.5, Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

Some links and notes on ESXi and virtualised NAS systems

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/05/27

For my own memory:

[WayBack] Best Hard Drives for ZFS Server (Updated 2017) | b3n.org

Best Buy Guides (BBGs) – mux’ blog – Tweakblogs – Tweakers « The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

ZFS, dedupe and RAM:

ZFS, FreeBSD, ZoL (ZFS on Linux) and SSDs:

OpenSuSE related

Samba/CIFS related

–jeroen

Posted in ESXi6.5, Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

Some wizardry: vmkfstools | virtualhobbit

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/05/24

Some wizardry: [WayBackvmkfstools | virtualhobbit.

This includes:

  • finding which VMFS partitions are there the hard way
  • initialising partitions from known good data
  • vmkfstools -V (yes, capital V is for VMFS rescan, as lowercase v is for verbose)

Found after reading [WayBackDatastore not mounted after reboot of ESXi5.5 |VMware Communities

Then found this:

That solved my problem!

# esxcfg-volume --list
Scanning for VMFS-3/VMFS-5 host activity (512 bytes/HB, 2048 HBs).
VMFS UUID/label: 532cd010-6e8c01d1-45be-001f29022aed/Raid6SSD
Can mount: Yes
Can resignature: Yes
Extent name: naa.600605b00aa054a0ff000021022683ae:1 range: 0 - 1830143 (MB)
# esxcfg-volume --mount 532cd010-6e8c01d1-45be-001f29022aed
Mounting volume volume 532cd010-6e8c01d1-45be-001f29022aed

And there it was:

# df -h
Filesystem   Size   Used Available Use% Mounted on
...
VMFS-5       1.7T   1.6T    169.6G  91% /vmfs/volumes/Raid6SSD
...

Note you can mount non-persistent (--mount) or persistent (--persistent-mount) by both UUID and label, so there are four choices for mounting:

esxcfg-volume --mount UUID
esxcfg-volume --mount label
esxcfg-volume --persistent-mount UUID
esxcfg-volume --persistent-mount label

–jeroen

Posted in ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

VMFS metadata files

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/05/09

For my own ference:

disk space under VMFS-3 is organized according to four resource types. They are : blocks, sub-blocks, pointer blocks, and file descriptors. Resources are grouped into clusters, which form cluster groups. Every resource type is administered by one or a number of system files. Lets have a look at what those abbreviated file names stand for:

  • fbb.sf = file block bitmap.sf
  • fdc.sf = file descriptor cluster.sf
  • pbc.sf = pointer block cluster.sf
  • sbc.sf = sub-block cluster.sf
  • vh.sf = volume header.sfs
  • dd.sf = scsi device description.sf

The VMFS-5 uses one more system file:

  • pb2.sf = pointer block 2.sf

Source: [Archive.isVMFS metadata files

Posted in ESXi4, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, Power User, Virtualization, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

 
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