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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for April 5th, 2018

Tumbleweed: Comparing your local version with the on-line versions

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/04/05

Comparing your local version with the on-line versions

Before upgrading a Tumbleweed system, it makes sense to check which is your local and which is the on-line version. This is actually a tad more complicated than it sounds.

There are three versions involved:

There is a mismatch between the last two as a side effect of decoupling the arm port a bit from the high checkin frequency of openSUSE:Factory; ARM simply has not enough power to build the snapshot in the same time Intel and PowerPC can do.

[WayBack] Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*) – A passionate openSUSE user thinks the last two are mismatched is a side effect off [WayBack] osc service remoterun operates on outdated sources (product builder) · Issue #4768 · openSUSE/open-build-service · GitHub.

He also tech-reviewed this post.

Your local release version

There are various ways to get your local version:

The easiest is to inspect the file  /etc/os-release, for instance 20180208 in the file content:

NAME="openSUSE Tumbleweed"
# VERSION="20180208 "
ID=opensuse ID_LIKE="suse"
VERSION_ID="20180208"
PRETTY_NAME="openSUSE Tumbleweed"
ANSI_COLOR="0;32"
CPE_NAME="cpe:/o:opensuse:tumbleweed:20180208"
BUG_REPORT_URL="https://bugs.opensuse.org"
HOME_URL="https://www.opensuse.org/"

You can also perform rpm --query --provides openSUSE-release | grep "product(openSUSE)" which for the same install returned this product(openSUSE) = 20180208-0.

Finally, you can use zypper to query the installed product which also includes the version:

$ zypper search --installed-only --type product --details
Loading repository data...
Reading installed packages...

S  | Name     | Type    | Version    | Arch    | Repository       
---+----------+---------+------------+---------+------------------
i+ | openSUSE | product | 20180228-0 | aarch64 | (System Packages)

The on-line release version

I will explain this for the aarch64 architecture, but the mechanism holds for all architectures, it is just that the directory names vary.

Architectures and base directories you can use this mechanism with:

Each architecture contains the version number in two kinds of places:

  1. The content of the repository meta data in a file named *-primary.xml.gz referenced from repomd.xml in the repodata subdirectory
  2. The filename of a package named ?P=openSUSE-release-2*

Back to the aarch64 architecture:

The on-line build version

I will explain this for the aarch64 architecture, but the mechanism holds for all architectures that build on openQA, it is just that the directory names vary and not all architectures are running on openQA.

Architectures and base directories you can use this mechanism with:

Architectures not on openQA:

  • armv6hl
  • armv7hl

Each platform contains the version number in two kinds of places:

  1. The content of the repository meta data in the file named media.1/media and media.1/products
  2. Names used in the openQA links

Back to the aarch64 architecture on the ARM platform:

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, Linux, openSuSE, Power User, SuSE Linux, Tumbleweed | Leave a Comment »

Do not use non-ASCII characters as identifiers – not all your tools support them well enough

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/04/05

For a very long time I’ve discouraged people from using non-ASCII characters in identifiers. It still holds.

In the past, transliterations messed things up. Even with increased support for Unicode, tools still screw non-ASCII characters up.

Delphi is not alone in this (the most important one is the DFM view as text support), see this report: [RSP-16767] Viewing a form as text fails with non ascii control or event names – Embarcadero Technologies (you need an account for this, but the report is visible for anyone):

Viewing a form as text fails with non ascii control or event names Comment

Steps:

  1. create a new VCL forms application
  2. drop a label onto the form
  3. change the name of that label to lblÜberfall (note the U-umlaut)
  4. switch to view as text
  • exp: DFM content shown as text
  • act: first line is shown incorrectly (see screenhsot)

–jeroen

Source: [RSP-16767] Viewing a form as text fails with non ascii control or event names – Embarcadero Technologies

via: [WayBack] Code of the day – – Thomas Mueller (dummzeuch) – Google+:

function TNameGenerator.StrasseToStrasse(const _Strasse: string): string;
begin
Result := _Strasse;
end;

Strasse := StrasseToStrasse(_Strasse);

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Posted in Delphi, Delphi 10 Seattle, Delphi 10.1 Berlin (BigBen), Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Delphi XE8, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Wizard to change Delphi Icon so it used the Projects’ Icon

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/04/05

Thomas Mueller (dummzeuch) – Google+ wrote this: [WayBackJust an inspiration from attila kovacs (too many guys with this name on G+ to…:

A Delphi Wizard that adds a menu item so the Delphi Icon will change into the icon of the currently loaded project.

Can be useful if you have many Delphi instances open.

Source at [WayBackhttp://pisil.de/bds_icon.txt

via: [WayBackIs anybody able and have time to create an extension … change the icon with Application.Icon… – Attila Kovacs – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in Delphi, Delphi 10 Seattle, Delphi 10.1 Berlin (BigBen), Delphi 2005, Delphi 2006, Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, Delphi 2010, Delphi 6, Delphi 7, Delphi XE, Delphi XE2, Delphi XE3, Delphi XE4, Delphi XE5, Delphi XE6, Delphi XE7, Delphi XE8, Development, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

Werkgevers mogen mensen met handicap onder minimumloon gaan betalen, dus gaat hun pensioen omlaag, ondanks aanvulling loon door de gemeenten

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/04/05

Het wordt voor werkgevers aantrekkelijker om mensen met een handicap in dienst te nemen. Zij mogen hen onder het minimumloon gaan betalen. Toch gaan de gehandicapte werknemers dan meer verdienen dan nu omdat zij van de gemeente een aanvulling tot het minimumloon kunnen krijgen. Wel verliezen zij hun recht op pensioen en bouwen zij minder aanspraak op voor de werkloosheidsuitkering en de arbeidsongeschiktheidsuitkering.

Het is toch veel handiger voor de overheid om dit voor mensen met een modaal salaris te doen?

Die staan vast geregeld bij de koffie automaat, zijn actief met katten-foto’s op social-media of hebben andere manieren om on-productief te zijn. Daar scoren ze gemiddeld vast wel een procent up 10 op.

Dan haal je al gauw op rijks-niveau een paar miljard binnen: een paar miljoen modalen met EUR 3000 minder per jaar waarvan rijkspremies ongeveer een derde zijn.

Dat is veel meer dan de in de toekomst (2050!) een half miljard te besparen (nu pakweg 10 miljoen per jaar).

Of verhoog de BTW met o.1%. Dan haal je direct al per jaar ongeveer 250 miljoen extra op, en verdeel je dat naar draagkracht evenredig over de bevolking.

Wat is eigenlijk productiviteit? Hoe productief zijn wetgevers eigenlijk? En hoe nuttig is productiviteit eigenlijk. Kun je dat wel objectief meten?

En waar komt het geld voor de gemeenten ineens vandaan? En de aanvulling op de pensioenen omdat gehandicapten – zonder vermogen, want dat is voor de meestel al lang opgegaan aan eigen bijdragen – straks echt onder het bestaansminimum zitten?

–jeroen

Bron: [WayBack] Werkgevers mogen mensen met handicap onder minimumloon gaan betalen – Binnenland – Voor nieuws, achtergronden en columns

Gerelateerd:

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