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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for July 17th, 2018

From the bragging “Did you know the IDE starts almost twice as fast in 10.2.2 as it did in 10.1?”

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/07/17

An interesting discussion sprouted from the bragging [WayBack] Did you know the IDE starts almost twice as fast in 10.2.2 as it did in 10.1? https://community.embarcadero.com/blogs/entry/new-in-10-2-2-welcome-page-… – David Millington – Google+.

I do not care very much about IDE start times (Visual Studio starts faster, others like Android Studio start slower than Delphi), more about productivity.

Which means loading projects, opening files and forms, switching projects, etcetera need to be fast and stable.

For me this is when on Delphi projects, I start about half a dozen copies of Delphi about 10 seconds apart (otherwise you get exceptions in any Galileo version), make some tea, then come back.

Each time an IDE crashes, I kill it, start a new one, switch to an existing one, load the projects I need and continue. On a full day working with Delphi, this happens about a dozen times a day.

After that I want to be productive.

Here is where I was so surprised by the great tip from Yusuf Zorlu

+Asbjørn Heid you should try to disable all “livebinding” packages + rename dclbindcomp250.bpl . If i opened a form before i had to wait 20 to 40 seconds … now it is superfast and opens forms under 5 seconds. I don’t need LiveBindings …

and the response by Asbjørn Heid

+Yusuf Zorlu Thank you! Holy cow that’s a difference! As you say, even our most complex forms are down to 4 seconds now.

I never use LiveBindings as they are way to convoluted, unstable and result in logic being in designers as opposed to tool-manageable code.

In addition, LiveBindings have never been really optimised since their inception in Delphi XE2.

This saves a lot of time!

So one day, I need to update Source: Delphi packages I have disabled by prefixing their description with an underscore (and why) and create a batch file with the various [WayBack] reg add commands modifying the package loads.

Related:

–jeroen

Posted in Conference Topics, Conferences, Delphi, Development, Event, Software Development | 2 Comments »

GExperts “Set Component Properties”

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/07/17

I totally forgot about [Archive.isGExperts Help: Set Component Properties

The main reason is that I hardly use any live connections in Delphi applications any more for mainly two reasons:

  • timing issues (varying from taking way too long to open something, via order what needs to be opened different between run-time and design-time, to )
  • pushing business logic further away from the user interface so it is easier to automatically test the business logic

But once every while I’m on a new site that has their own tool-chain installed and I see screens like this one:

I’m not alone on this: [WayBack] Does anybody know where the following dialog window come from? I need to disable it but failed to find the source IDE plugin – Edwin Yip – Google+

The good thing is that it can bring certain components into a know state before compiling your application.

But this is a thing your CI environment should already do for you.

–jeroen

 

Posted in Delphi, Development, GExperts, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

PowerShell on Mac OS X and other non-Windows systems

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/07/17

I wasn’t expecting it to be so easy to install PowerShell on Mac OS X:

brew install Caskroom/cask/powershell

In the background it executes this script: https://github.com/caskroom/homebrew-cask/blob/master/Casks/powershell.rb. which indirectly goes through the URL template https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/download/v#{version}/powershell-#{version}.pkg.

On other non-Windows systems, you have to go through GitHub yourself: https://github.com/powershell/PowerShell. The PowerShell team at Microsoft has many more repositories including the Win32-OpenSSH port which you can find through https://github.com/PowerShell.

At the time of writing, PowerShell was available for these platforms:

Platform Downloads How to Install
Windows 10 / Server 2016 (x64) .msi Instructions
Windows 8.1 / Server 2012 R2 (x64) .msi Instructions
Windows 7 (x64) .msi Instructions
Windows 7 (x86) .msi Instructions
Ubuntu 16.04 .deb Instructions
Ubuntu 14.04 .deb Instructions
CentOS 7 .rpm Instructions
OpenSUSE 42.1 .rpm Instructions
Arch Linux Instructions
Many Linux distributions .AppImage Instructions
macOS 10.11 .pkg Instructions
Docker Instructions

The first version I installed on Mac OS X was this: ==> Downloading https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/download/v6.0.0-alpha.17/powershell-6.0.0-alpha.17.pkg

By now I really hope it is out of Alpha state.

–jeroen

via:

Posted in *nix, Apple, CommandLine, Development, iMac, Linux, Mac, Mac OS X / OS X / MacOS, MacBook, MacBook Retina, MacBook-Air, MacBook-Pro, MacMini, openSuSE, Power User, PowerShell, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, SuSE Linux, Ubuntu | Leave a Comment »

 
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