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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for January 11th, 2022

Twitter: find my new-style retweets that have images

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/01/11

This gets the tweets I retweeted and have images in them:

from:@jpluimers filter:images filter:nativeretweets

Based on:

  • [Wayback] twitter – How do I find my retweets of a certain account? – Web Applications Stack Exchange
    from:@someone filter:nativeretweets [KEYWORD(s)]
    

    This shows all retweets of @someone (including the optional KEYWORD(s)). If you retweeted the same tweet you can use @yourtwittername instead of @someone.

  • This article gives you a robust overview of everything you need to know about advanced TweetDeck features.[Wayback] About advanced TweetDeck features

    To search for mentions of #space from verified accounts, excluding Retweets, type the following in the search box: #space filter:verified -filter:nativeretweets

  • [Wayback] Difference between -filter:retweet and -filter:nativeretweets in Twitter Search API 1.1 – Stack Overflow

    I believe per TweetDeck documentation (https://support.twitter.com/articles/20170322) this is the difference:

    filter:nativeretweets shows retweets from users who have hit the retweet button. filter:retweets shows old style retweets (“RT”) + quoted tweets.

    Those are filtering FOR those types of results, but as you’ve done, the – is necessary to filter them out -filter:nativeretweets or -filter:retweets

  • [Wayback/Archive.is] Twitter API 1.1 tweets / favorites (likes) / following / followers backup in web browser
    /* Twitter API 1.1 tweets / favorites (likes) / following / followers backup in web browser
     * Get your access keys to use Twitter API 1.1: https://dev.twitter.com/docs/auth/tokens-devtwittercom
     * You can change Twitter API URL and Twitter screen_name, then execute script from a trusted web page without CSP protection like about:blank in a web browser console (F12 or Ctrl+Shift+K shortcut)
     * A textarea will appear so you can copy/paste to save data as a CSV file or search tweets / users in your web browser (Ctrl+F shortcut)
     * You can then view your backup in a spreadsheet editor like LibreOffice Calc
     * You can also compare the backup with another one to see who unfollowed you, who changed their Twitter username by looking at the user ID or which tweet you retweeted / favorited was deleted (e.g. with the Linux diff command)
     * 
     * Note about the tweets backup:
     * Usually you will search tweets that you retweeted using Twitter web version (https://twitter.com/search) with a search like "from:your_username filter:nativeretweets keyword"
     * But it is limited to the retweets of the last 7 days, like for the free version of the search API (https://developer.twitter.com/en/docs/tweets/search/overview/standard)
     * An alternative is to search tweets in your user timeline with this script but it is limited to your last 3200 tweets (including retweets and replies)
     * This script can be combined with the Twitter feature to backup data, which is not limited to your last 3200 tweets but you can only request a backup every 30 days
     * To find tweets that you retweeted or favorited / liked from a specific person, you can open the CSV file with LibreOffice Calc, click on the column you want to search and press Ctrl+H to search a username
    */

–jeroen

Posted in Development, JavaScript/ECMAScript, Power User, Scripting, SocialMedia, Software Development, Twitter | Leave a Comment »

Security questions are evil because of social media “games” phishing for them

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/01/11

Via [Archive.is] Jilles Groenendijk on Twitter: “what @AppSecBloke said… “, from:

I don’t normally do this but here goes:

First job STOP
Current job SENDING
Dream Job YOUR
Favorite food POTENTIAL
Favorite dog PASSWORDS
Favorite footwear OR
Favorite Chocolate bar MEMORABLE
Favorite Ice Cream DATA
Your Vehicle color TO
Favorite Holiday PEOPLE
Night owl or earlybird WHO
Favorite day of the week COLLECT
Tattoos THIS
Favourite colour INFORMATION
Do you like vegetables FOR
Do you wear glasses SOCIAL
Favourite season ENGINEERING

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Facebook, Instagram, LifeHacker, Pen Testing, Power User, Security, SocialMedia | Leave a Comment »

VMware ESXi and vSphere: vmNIC speeds are limited by your CPU and RAM speeds, not by the vNIC drivers

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/01/11

Still a lot of people think that network speed depends on the vNIC driver and vNIC speed settings.

This is not true: it mainly depends on CPU and RAM speeds as that is where the bottleneck of virtual network processing is.

See:

  • [Wayback] VMXNET3 = 10GbE ? – Hypervisor.fr
  • [Wayback] Debunking the VM Link Speed Myth! – vswitchzero

    10Gbps from a 10Mbps NIC? Why not? Debunking the VM link speed myth once and for all!

    And again, we see  the same pattern. Link speed – even from an adapter type that never supported 10Gbps – has no bearing at all on actual throughput and performance.

    Thankfully, even standard vSwitches support traffic shaping, where you can limit throughput. If you are trying to accomplish this, the traffic shaping feature is a fully functional way to achieve this.

  • [Wayback] virtual_networking_concepts.pdf

    Note: The speed and duplex settings found in physical networking are not relevant in the virtual network, because all the data transfer takes place in the host system’s RAM, nearly instantaneously and without the possibility of collisions or other signaling-related errors.

    vSwitch and vNIC speeds mainly depend on CPU and RAM speeds.

    vSwitch and vNIC speeds mainly depend on CPU and RAM speeds.

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, VMware, VMware ESXi, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, Virtualization, ESXi6, ESXi6.5, ESXi6.7, ESXi7 | Leave a Comment »

 
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