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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for November 11th, 2016

One of the #EKON20 running gags: Raize condition

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/11/11

When Ray Konopka enters the room you have a Raize condition.

Via the EKON20 sessions, it made its way into the workshop If you thought you could do multi-threading, then play “The Deadlock Empire” games – Entwickler Konferenz

–jeroen

Posted in Conferences, Delphi, Development, EKON, Event, Software Development | Leave a Comment »

how to resize (grow) device partition of a multi-device BTRFS filesystem?

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/11/11

To grow you must first change the size of the container: the partition, the LV, or arraydevice. Then you can resize the file system. It’s the same with XFS, and NTFS. I’m only aware of Apple’sdiskutil resizevolume command that resizes the flavors of HFS+ and at the same time sets the new end valuefor the partition entry.

Source: Development of the BTRFS linux file system (not yet archived at the WayBack machine)

I will need the above for a single disk device having a BTRFS partition sandwiched between a swap and xfs partition:

# parted -l
Model: VMware Virtual disk (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 21.5GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos
Disk Flags: 

Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system     Flags
 1      1049kB  1562MB  1561MB  primary  linux-swap(v1)  type=82
 2      1562MB  17.7GB  16.1GB  primary  btrfs           boot, type=83
 3      17.7GB  21.5GB  3799MB  primary  xfs             type=83

I’ll likekly be:

  1. extend the disk inin ESXi
  2. use gparted to move the xfs partition to the end of the disk
  3. use gparted to extend the btrfs partition
  4. use btrfs to extend the volume inside the btrfs partition

I might be able to do all this from the gparted live CD as moving xfs and growing btrfs is on the GParted — Features list.

Fingers crossed. Luckily I’ve backups (:

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, ESXi4, ESXi5, ESXi5.1, ESXi5.5, ESXi6, Linux, openSuSE, Power User, SuSE Linux, Tumbleweed, VMware, VMware ESXi | Leave a Comment »

openSuSE Tumbleweed: solution for `ImportError: No module named pkg_resources`

Posted by jpluimers on 2016/11/11

If ever on openSuSE Tumbleweed you get an error ImportError: No module named pkg_resources then check you have the installed the python-setuptools package it is different from python3-setuptools which was installed by default but is not the default python used.

This is how to install it:

zypper install python-setuptools

Tools like speedtest-cli require it.

The odd thing: on a Mac, the homebrew speedtest-cli installed and ran with no additional packages needed:

retinambpro1tb:tmp jeroenp$ brew install speedtest-cli
==> Downloading https://github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/archive/v0.3.2.tar.gz
==> Downloading from https://codeload.github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/tar.gz/v0.3.2
######################################################################## 100.0%
🍺 /usr/local/Cellar/speedtest_cli/0.3.2: 5 files, 52K, built in 2 seconds
retinambpro1tb:tmp jeroenp$ speedtest-cli
Retrieving speedtest.net configuration...
Retrieving speedtest.net server list...
Testing from Routit BV (37.153.243.246)...
Selecting best server based on latency...
Hosted by ExtraIP (Amersfoort) [3.99 km]: 6.488 ms
Testing download speed........................................
Download: 49.89 Mbit/s
Testing upload speed..................................................
Upload: 47.81 Mbit/s

(this is on one of my fiber connections back when it was 50/50 megabit).

Note that for both the web interface of speedtest.net and command-line versions (like Python based speedtest-cli) sometimes needs some fiddling with chosen servers and repeated measurements to get a consistent average as quite some factors can influence the measurements.

For my home location, this one gives me the most consistent results for my fiber connections (they’re so good and reliable that I don’t have ADSL or cable any more):

speedtest-cli --server 3629

You can get the list of servers ordered by increasing distance using this command:

speedtest-cli --list | head -n 20

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Linux, openSuSE, Power User, SuSE Linux | 2 Comments »

 
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