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Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Console (command prompt window)’ Category

When NTFS shrink fails, despite using the default settings from the shrink dialog

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/05/25

Sometimes an NTFS shrink still fails, even though you use the built in Windows defragmentation tools, of SysInternals contig tool.

The best you can do is to follow the steps in:

  1. run diskmgmt.msc to try shrinking the disk, then often it is already in the error message: “You can’t shrink a volume beyond the point where any unremoveable files are located see the defrag event in application log for detailed information about the operation when it has completed.”
  2. use eventvwr.exe and look at the Windows Logs for the most recent Application entries that has Source set to defrag

Those defrag entries usually tell about the last file that could not be moved.

You can use wevtutill to query events on the commandline.

Note that contrary to [WayBack] WEVTUTIL – Windows CMD – SS64.com documentation, the option /rd cannot be expanded to /reversedirection , as you will get an error “invalid option reversedirection” – Google Search.

For querying the above defrag event, use this command line (replace /format:XML with /format:text for more readable but also more verbose output):

wevtutil query-events Application /count:2 /format:XML /rd:true /query:"*[System[(EventID=259)]]"

On Windows 10, this is often caused by “System Protection” which locks files under C:\Recovery, but I have also seen $BITMAP, $MFT and $DATA entries.

System protected drives

To view which drives are currently used for system protection (this opens the “System Properties” dialog focussed on the “System Protection” tab):

SystemPropertiesProtection.exe

To disable it for one drive:

Disable-ComputerRestore -Drive "C:"

To enable it for one drive:

Enable-ComputerRestore -Drive "C:"

There seems to be no easy one-command PowerShell way to view the drives have ComputerRestore enabled, as this does not show drive letters:

PowerShell Get-ComputerRestorePoint ^| Format-List

The above gives more detailed output than a plain PowerShell Get-ComputerRestorePoint

Deleting restore points

PowerShell does not have a built-in option to delete restore points, but vssadmin has, but calls them “shadows”.

First list them:

vssadmin list shadows

Then delete them (but be aware this will not prompt for confirmation because of the /quiet):

vssadmin delete shadows /for=C: /quiet

You can also delete them for all drives (this will not prompt for confirmation either):

vssadmin delete shadows /all /quiet

Stopping the volume shadow copy service:

net stop vss

Managing hibernation and page file

Hibernation:

powercfg.exe /hibernate off

powercfg.exe /hibernate on

Page file:

wmic pagefile list /format:list
AllocatedBaseSize=2944

CurrentUsage=0
Description=C:\pagefile.sys
InstallDate=20181018215808.683376+120
Name=C:\pagefile.sys
PeakUsage=0
Status=
TempPageFile=FALSE

wmic computersystem where name="%computername%" get AutomaticManagedPagefile
AutomaticManagedPagefile
TRUE

wmic computersystem where name="%computername%" set AutomaticManagedPagefile=False
Updating property(s) of '\\MYCOMPUTER\ROOT\CIMV2:Win32_ComputerSystem.Name="LAPTOPUW08"'
Property(s) update successful.

wmic computersystem where name="%computername%" get AutomaticManagedPagefile
AutomaticManagedPagefile
FALSE

wmic.exe pagefileset where name="C:\\pagefile.sys" delete
Deleting instance \\MYCOMPUTER\ROOT\CIMV2:Win32_PageFileSetting.Name="C:\\pagefile.sys"
Instance deletion successful.

Sometimes the deletion does not work (see below for workaround):

wmic pagefile list /format:list

AllocatedBaseSize=2944
CurrentUsage=0
Description=C:\pagefile.sys
InstallDate=20181018215808.683376+120
Name=C:\pagefile.sys
PeakUsage=0
Status=
TempPageFile=FALSE

Do not do this:

wmic pagefile delete
Deleting instance \\MYCOMPUTER\ROOT\CIMV2:Win32_PageFileUsage.Name="C:\\pagefile.sys"
ERROR:
Description = Provider is not capable of the attempted operation

wmic pagefileset set name="c:\\pagefile.sys",InitialSize=0,MaximumSize=0
No Instance(s) Available.

Sometimes it still fails, so then you have to use the UI:

  1. Run SystemPropertiesAdvanced.exe
  2. Under Performance, click on Settings
  3. Click the Advanced tab
  4. Under Virtual memory, click the Change button
  5. Ensure Automatically manage page file size for all drives is disabled
  6. Ensure No paging file is selected
  7. Click the Set button
  8. Confirm you really want no page file
  9. Press on the three OK buttons to fully leave the Advanced System Properties dialog.
  10. Reboot

After resizing the disk, reverse the steps:

  1. Run SystemPropertiesAdvanced.exe
  2. Under Performance, click on Settings
  3. Click the Advanced tab
  4. Under Virtual memory, click the Change button
  5. Ensure Automatically manage page file size for all drives is enabled
  6. Confirm you really want no page file
  7. Press on the three OK buttons to fully leave the Advanced System Properties dialog.
  8. Reboot

Bitmap file

Sometimes the file blocking the resize is the NTFS "\$BitMap::$DATA", which few defragmentation tools can move as it is the MFT Bitmap.

Background reading

–jeroen

Posted in CommandLine, Console (command prompt window), Development, Power User, PowerShell, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, Windows | Leave a Comment »

Some FindStr links

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/23

When searching text files on Windows, often FindStr is the only tool at hand. Given the MS-DOS ancestry, it carries quite a bit of history, so here are a few links on the quirks it has:

General references:

–jeroen

Posted in Console (command prompt window), Power User, Windows | Leave a Comment »

When an installer errors out with “Please re-run this installer as a normal user instead of”…

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/08/12

Via [WayBack] Anyone with a hint on how to work around this: … “Please re-run this installer as a normal user instead of”… – Jeroen Wiert Pluimers – Google+

This happened for instance when trying to install Source Tree 2.x on Windows (1.9.x works fine):

[Window Title]
SourceTreeSetup-2.3.1.0.exe

[Main Instruction]
Installation has failed

[Content]
Please re-run this installer as a normal user instead of “Run as Administrator”.

[Close]

The problem was by accident the machine got in a state to run commands without UAC approval, so the run dialog would already look have “This task will be created with administrative privileges”:

It was odd, as the machine didn’t have it enabled in the security policy (secpo.msc):

So I did a bit more digging, bumped into [WayBack] Why does my Run dialog say that tasks will created with administrative privileges? – The Old New Thing and had one of those #facepalm moments: Explorer had crashed, and I had started it from Process Explorer, forgetting Process Explorer had an UAC token.

The solution is easy:

  1. Logoff / Logon
  2. Verify the Windows-R shows a “normal” run:

Then you can just run the installer:

–jeroen

Posted in Batch-Files, Console (command prompt window), Development, Power User, Scripting, Software Development, The Old New Thing, Windows, Windows Development | Leave a Comment »

How can I open a cmd window in a specific location? – Stack Overflow

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/03/19

Based on [WayBack] How can I open a cmd window in a specific location? – Stack Overflow:

cmd /K "pushd ""D:\Versioned Stuff\wiert.me"""

The quoting is required for paths having spaces, so I always include them just in case I ever have a path with spaces.

If I want it with bash, then I run it as follows:

cmd /K "pushd ""D:\Versioned Stuff\wiert.me""" && "C:\Program Files\Git\bin\bash.exe"

Documentation: [WayBack] CD Change Directory – Windows CMD – SS64.com

–jeroen

Posted in CommandLine, Console (command prompt window), Development, Power User, Software Development, Windows | Leave a Comment »

Run cmd as elevated user (via: windows – How to run batch file command with elevated permissions? – Super User)

Posted by jpluimers on 2019/03/13

Based on [WayBack] windows – How to run batch file command with elevated permissions? – Super User:

powershell -command "Start-Process cmd.exe -Verb runas"

This works better than "runas /user:administrator cmd.exe" as that forces to use the specific Administrator account, whereas the PowerShell way allows you to specify the actual account during elevation.

You can extend this to run a command with one or more parameters based on [WayBack] Launch Elevated CMD.exe from Powershell – Stack Overflow (thanks [WayBack] mklement0):

powershell -command "Start-Process cmd.exe -Verb runas -Args /k, call, goto-bin"

This will actually pass “call goto-bin” to cmd.exe which tries to execute the “goto-bin” command (which I have around on the PATH as goto-bin.bat).

You can either use comma-separated parameters or a quoted string. In this expansion, comma-separated is easier in this PowerShell construct.

–jeroen

Posted in Batch-Files, CommandLine, Console (command prompt window), Development, Power User, PowerShell, PowerShell, Scripting, Software Development, Windows | Leave a Comment »

 
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