The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

  • My badges

  • Twitter Updates

  • My Flickr Stream

  • Pages

  • All categories

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,514 other followers

Archive for the ‘SHA’ Category

Supermicro Bios Update – YouTube

Posted by jpluimers on 2020/09/14

I needed to get myself an OOB license for the BIOS update over the IPMI console or SUM (Supermicro Update Manager). An IPMI update can be done without an OOB license from the IPMI console, but the BIOS requires a license.

Links that initially helped me with that to get a feel for what I needed:

I thought that likely I need to purchase a key for it:

Obtain the license code from your IPMI BMC MAC address

But then I found out the below links on reverse engineering.

From those links, I checked both the Perl and Linux OpenSSL versions. Only the Perl version works on MacOS.

Then I fiddled with the bash version: unlike the OpenSSL version above, this one printed output. It wrongly printed the last groups of hex digits instead of the first groups of hex digits that the Perl script prints.

Here is the corrected bash script printing the first groups of hex digits (on my systems, I have an alias supermicro_hash_IPMI_BMC_MAC_address_to_get_OOB_license_for_BIOS_update for it):

#!/bin/bash
function hash_mac {
  mac="$1"
  key="8544e3b47eca58f9583043f8"
  sub="\x"
  #convert mac to hex
  hexmac="\x${mac//:/$sub}"
  #create hash
  code=$(printf "$hexmac" | openssl dgst -sha1 -mac HMAC -macopt hexkey:"$key")
  #DEBUG
  echo "$mac"
  echo "$hexmac"
  echo "$code"

  echo "${code:0:4}-${code:4:4}-${code:8:4}-${code:12:4}-${code:16:4}-${code:20:4}"
}

Steps

Reverse engineering links

  • [WayBack] The better way to update Supermicro BIOS is via IPMI – VirtualLifestyle.nl

    Another way to update the BIOS via the Supermicro IPMI for free is simply calculating the license key yourself as described here: https://peterkleissner.com/2018/05/27/reverse-engineering-supermicro-ipmi/ [WayBack].

    • [WayBack] Reverse Engineering Supermicro IPMI – peterkleissner.com

      Algorithm:

      MAC-SHA1-96(INPUT: MAC address of BMC, SECRET KEY: 85 44 E3 B4 7E CA 58 F9 58 30 43 F8)

      Update 1/14/2019: The Twitter user @astraleureka posted this code perl code which is generating the license key:

      #!/usr/bin/perl
      use strict;
      use Digest::HMAC_SHA1 'hmac_sha1';
      my $key  = "\x85\x44\xe3\xb4\x7e\xca\x58\xf9\x58\x30\x43\xf8";
      my $mac  = shift || die 'args: mac-addr (i.e. 00:25:90:cd:26:da)';
      my $data = join '', map { chr hex $_ } split ':', $mac;
      my $raw  = hmac_sha1($data, $key);
      printf "%02lX%02lX-%02lX%02lX-%02lX%02lX-%02lX%02lX-%02lX%02lX-%02lX%02lX\n", (map { ord $_ } split '', $raw);

      Update 3/27/2019: There is also Linux shell version that uses openssl:

      echo -n 'bmc-mac' | xxd -r -p | openssl dgst -sha1 -mac HMAC -macopt hexkey:8544E3B47ECA58F9583043F8 | awk '{print $2}' | cut -c 1-24
    • [WayBack] Modular conversion, encoding and encryption online — Cryptii

      Web app offering modular conversion, encoding and encryption online. Translations are done in the browser without any server interaction. This is an Open Source project, code licensed MIT.

      Steps:

      1. In the left pane, select the “View” drop-down to be “Bytes”, then paste the HEX bytes of your IPMI MAC address there (like 00 25 90 7d 9c 25)
      2. In the middle pane, select the drop-down to become “HMAC” followed by the radio-group to be “SHA1“, then paste these bytes into the “Key” field: 85 44 E3 B4 7E CA 58 F9 58 30 43 F8
      3. In the right pane, select the drop-down to become “Bytes”, then the “Group by” to become “2 bytes”, which will you give the output (where the bold part is the license key: 6 groups of 2 bytes): a7d5 2201 4eee 667d dbd2 5106 9595 2ff7 67b8 fb59

      Result:

    • Michael Stapelberg’s private website, containing articles about computers and programming, mostly focused on Linux.[WayBack] Securing SuperMicro’s IPMI with OpenVPN
    • [WayBack] GitHub – ReFirmLabs/binwalk: Firmware Analysis Tool
  • [WayBack] The better way to update Supermicro BIOS is via IPMI – VirtualLifestyle.nl

    Ahh…..a few corrections :-P

    #!/bin/bash
    function hash_mac {
      mac="$1"
      key="8544e3b47eca58f9583043f8"
      sub="\x"
      #convert mac to hex
      hexmac="\x${mac//:/$sub}"
      #create hash
      code=$(printf "$hexmac" | openssl dgst -sha1 -mac HMAC -macopt hexkey:"$key")
      #DEBUG
      echo "$mac"
      echo "$hexmac"
      echo "$code"
      echo "${code:9:4} ${code:13:4} ${code:17:4} ${code:21:4} ${code:25:4} ${code:29:4}"
    }
    #hex output with input
    hash_mac "$1"
    
    #Look out for the quotes, they might get changed by different encoding
  • [WayBack] The better way to update Supermicro BIOS is via IPMI – VirtualLifestyle.nl

    Thanks Peter. For anyone interested, here’s a bash script that takes the MAC as the only argument and outputs the activation key:

    #!/bin/bash
    function hash_mac {
      mac="$1"
      key="8544e3b47eca58f9583043f8"
      sub="\x"
      #convert mac to hex
      hexmac="\x${mac//:/$sub}"
      #create hash
      code=$(printf "$hexmac" | openssl dgst -sha1 -mac HMAC -macopt hexkey:"$key")
      ## DEBUG
      echo "$mac"
      echo "$hexmac"
      echo "$code"
      echo "${code:9:4} ${code:13:4} ${code:17:4} ${code:21:4} ${code:25:4} ${code:29:4}"
    }
    ## hex output with input
    hash_mac "$1"

 

–jeroen

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Development, Encoding, Hardware, Hashing, HMAC, Mainboards, OpenSSL, Power User, Security, SHA, SHA-1, Software Development, SuperMicro, X10SRH-CF | Leave a Comment »

A cheat-sheet for password crackers

Posted by jpluimers on 2018/07/30

Interesting: [WayBackA cheat-sheet for password crackers

Via: [WayBackJoe C. Hecht – Google+

–jeroen

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, Hashing, md5, Power User, Security, SHA, SHA-256, SHA-512 | Leave a Comment »

OpenSuSE Tumbleweed – testing the password of any user with getent and openssl

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/06/21

For one of my VMs I forgot to note which of the initial password I had changed, so I wanted to check them.

Since I didn’t have a keyboard attached to the console and ssh wasn’t allowing root, I needed an alternative than actual login to test the passwords.

Luckily /etc/shadow, with getent and openssl came to the rescue.

Since getent varies per distribution, here is how it works on OpenSuSE:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in *nix, *nix-tools, ash/dash, bash, bash, Development, Encoding, Hashing, Linux, md5, openSuSE, Power User, Scripting, Security, SHA, SHA-256, SHA-512, Software Development, SuSE Linux | Leave a Comment »

SHAttered – stop using SHA-1; it’s broken

Posted by jpluimers on 2017/02/24

We have broken SHA-1 in practice.

This industry cryptographic hash function standard is used for digital signatures and file integrity verification, and protects a wide spectrum of digital assets, ranging credit card transactions, electronic documents, open-source software repositories and software updates.

It is now practically possible to craft two colliding PDF files and obtain a SHA-1 digital signature on the first PDF file which can also be abused as a valid signature on the second PDF file.

For example, by crafting the two colliding PDF files as two rental agreements with different rent, it is possible to trick someone to create a valid signature for a high-rent contract by having him or her sign a low-rent contract.

–jeroen

Posted in Encryption, Hashing, Power User, Security, SHA | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: