The Wiert Corner – irregular stream of stuff

Jeroen W. Pluimers on .NET, C#, Delphi, databases, and personal interests

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Archive for the ‘Windows Vista’ Category

A year ago on Telegram: “Do I need to use GarbageCollectAtoms in Delphi? I used it in delphi 7, but I dont know what is benefit. 😐”

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/10/20

Last week I found out that I had some Windows ATOM issues before, but this beats them easily was still a draft in stead if in the blog queue.

I got reminded to it by someone asking on Telegram about

“Do I need to use GarbageCollectAtoms in Delphi? I used it in delphi 7, but I dont know what is benefit. 😐”.

The short answer is: yes, if your Delphi application does terminate in a way that the Controls unit cannot cleanly unload (and cannot free the Windows atoms) or leaks Windows atoms in a different way. I have been in that situation and that’s why I wrote the above blog post that got published in 2016.

The longer answer is likely no, both the Windows atom and registered Windows message table share a heap and that registered VCL Windows message leaking bug got fixed some 10 years ago in Delphi XE2, see:

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Conference Topics, Conferences, Delphi, Development, Event, Power User, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows NT, Windows Server 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, Windows Vista, Windows XP | Leave a Comment »

I had some Windows ATOM issues before, but this beats them easily

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/10/19

I’ve had some issues with Windows ATOM tables filling up, but nothing like this security bypass:

A new Windows code injection technique, atombombing, which bypasses current security solutions.

Source: AtomBombing: Brand New Code Injection for Windows – Breaking Malware [WayBack] with source code at BreakingMalwareResearch/atom-bombing: Brand New Code Injection for Windows

Note that since writing the first draft, the above AtomBombing article moved via Wayback: blog.ensilo.com to [Wayback/Archive.is] AtomBombing – A Brand New Code Injection Technique for Windows | FortiGuard Labs.

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Posted in Development, Power User, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 9, Windows Development, Windows Server 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, Windows Vista, Windows XP | Leave a Comment »

Windows: shutdown or reboot while preserving most of the running apps has been possible since…

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/05/26

Vista!

Shutting down or rebooting Windows allowing existing applications to reopen

Windows Vista introduced the /g switch in shutdown.exe and was unchanged in Windows 7:

    /g         Shutdown and restart the computer. After the system is
               rebooted, restart any registered applications.

I never noticed it until Windows 10 which began actively use it when applying system updates: then suddenly many of the previously running applications would reopen during startup.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, Windows Vista, Windows XP | Leave a Comment »

The Evolution of Windows Search | Windows Search Platform

Posted by jpluimers on 2022/01/03

Great post [WayBack] The Evolution of Windows Search | Windows Search Platform, covering some 3 decades of search:

  • 1991 (Cairo with WinFS)
  • 1996 (Windows NT 4.0)
  • 2000 (Windows 2000)
  • 2001 (Windows XP)
  • 2007 (Windows Vista)
  • 2009 (Windows 7)
  • 2012 (Windows 8.x)
  • 2015 (Windows 10)

It is part 1 of a series of 4 posts by [WayBack] Brendan Flynn, Author at Windows Search Platform:

  1. The Evolution of Windows Search  👈  You Are here
  2. Windows Search Configuration and Settings
  3. What’s in my index?
  4. How to make the most of search on Windows

When grabbing them, only the first two parts were available. Part two was about [WayBack] Configuration and Settings | Windows Search Platform with an in depth coverage of both the old style Control Panel applet as the new Windows 10 Settings page.

Via: [Archive.is] Immo Landwerth on Twitter: “If you like Raymond Chen’s The Old New Thing, then you might love this new developer focused blog too. It starts with an interesting history of Windows Search, by @brflynn_ms. Enjoy & subscribe!”

–jeroen

Posted in Power User, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows NT, Windows Server 2000, Windows Vista, Windows XP | Leave a Comment »

Digging Through Event Log Hell (finding user logon & logoff) – Ars Technica OpenForum

Posted by jpluimers on 2021/08/31

This helped me big time finding failed logon attempts: [WayBack] Event Log Hell (finding user logon & logoff) – Ars Technica OpenForum

Alternatively, you can use the XPath query mechanism included in the Windows 7 event viewer. In the event viewer, select “Filter Current Log…”, choose the XML tab, tick “Edit query manually”, then copy the following to the textbox:

Code:
<QueryList>
  <Query Id="0" Path="Security">
    <Select Path="Security">*[System[EventID=4624] and EventData[Data[@Name='TargetUserName'] = 'USERNAME']]</Select>
  </Query>
</QueryList>

This selects all events from the Security log with EventID 4624 where the EventData contains a Data node with a Name value of TargetUserName that is equal to USERNAME. Remember to replace USERNAME with the name of the user you’re looking for.

If you need to be even more specific, you can use additional XPath querying – have a look at the detail view of an event and select the XML view to see the data that you are querying into.

Thanks user Hamstro!

Notes:

Related:

–jeroen

Posted in Development, Microsoft Surface on Windows 7, Power User, Software Development, Windows, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 9, Windows Vista, Windows XP, XML/XSD | Leave a Comment »

 
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